foveolar hyperplasia

foveolar hyperplasia

A histopathological manifestation of reactive gastritis which is most pronounced in chemical gastritis.

Aetiology
Bile reflux, drugs (e.g., NSAIDs), hyperplastic polyp, juvenile polyposis, Menetrier’s disease, regeneration at edge of an ulcer.
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References in periodicals archive ?
sup][1],[2] Long-term duodenogastric reflux (DGR) can cause pathological conditions such as chronic gastritis, foveolar hyperplasia, intestinal metaplasia, gastric dysplasia, gastric polyp, and gastric cancer.
pylori infection, foveolar hyperplasia, and dysplasia did not differ significantly among these three groups [Table 1].
sup][15] Excessive DGR results in accelerated regeneration of epithelium with histological appearance of foveolar hyperplasia and expansion of the smooth muscle fiber in the mucosa.
Histologically the mucosa reveals oedema, foveolar hyperplasia, smooth-muscle proliferation, regeneration and, on occasion, erosion with a relatively mild inflammatory cell response.
A chronic gastritis with marked foveolar hyperplasia, which may be cystic or polypoid, develops proximal to the stoma.
Reactive gastropathy, the second most common histologic diagnosis made on gastric biopsies, (7) is characterized by foveolar hyperplasia lined by tall columnar cells with variable mucin depletion and enlarged hyperchromatic nuclei.
Foveolar hyperplasia is a response to excessive cell exfoliation from the surface epithelium.
There is a close relationship between reflux (with bile concentrations at 10%-20% of levels found in hepatic bile), foveolar hyperplasia, and cell proliferation.