foveation

foveation

 [fo″ve-a´shun]
formation of pits on a surface, as on the skin; a pitted condition.

fo·ve·a·tion

(fō'vē-ā'shŭn),
Pitted scar formation, as in smallpox, chickenpox, or vaccinia.
[L. fovea, a pit]

foveation

/fo·ve·a·tion/ (fo″ve-a´shun) formation of pits on a surface as on the skin; a pitted condition.

foveation

Formation of pits on the skin or other surface; in practice, foveation is little used in the working medical parlance, and the plain English “pitting” is widely preferred.

fo·ve·a·tion

(fō-vē-ā'shŭn)
Pitted scar formation, as in chickenpox.
[L. fovea, a pit]

foveation

formation of pits on a surface, as on the skin; a pitted condition.
References in periodicals archive ?
Automatic foveation for video compression using a neurobiological model of visual attention.
6) The duration of foveation periods has been thought of as a surrogate 'visual' measure of a waveform (discussed later).
When there is no stress attached to a task (for example no time constraint on performance), increasing visual demand does not increase nystagmus, (7) but may actually increase foveation periods.
In the medical model, it is assumed that an oculomotor abnormality gives rise to nystagmus, which then causes visual impairment due to poor foveation.
28) developed an objective performance measure based on an individual's foveation periods called a nystagmus acuity function (NAF).
Rephrased in New Historicist terminology, the rhetorical analysis of the anecdote enables insight into its foveation, its "ability to keep an object within the high-resolution area of perception" (10) (Greenblatt 34).
Humans have a visual mechanism, called foveation, that moves the head and eyes so that information of potential interest will fall on the cell-dense region of the fovea, and thus activate more cells in the cortex.
We speculate that synchronous local activation of representations in cortical auditory, visual and motor maps is required for foveation, attention to visual detail in words, and automatizing phoneme-grapheme associations.
If one somehow records the time-registered locations of foveations, continuously or very frequently, one will have a record of the temporal and spatial patterns of eye movements--a "scan path" when diagrammed.