foveal vision


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foveal vision

Perception of objects whose images fall on the FOVEA centralis-the most discriminating part of the RETINA. Also known as photopic vision.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gaze-contingent masking was used throughout the face display (see Calvo & Nummenmaa, 2007): If the viewer initiated a saccade away from the cued eye region towards the mouth, a black mask covered the bottom half of the face, thus the mouth always remained inaccessible to foveal vision.
Post hoc comparisons showed that participants using parafoveal vision had the fastest reaction time, 626[+ or -]8ms, compared with foveal vision 661[+ or -]10ms and peripheral vision 661[+ or -]9ms.
This would imply that the beginning of the word in the right visual field could fall in foveal vision (whereas its end would be in the parafovea); in contrast, the opposite would apply to the word in the left visual field.
001, even in the overlay condition, in which the visual onset of the secondary task would probably be in foveal vision.
The key benefits of foveal vision are its simultaneous wide FOV, high resolution, high frame rates, low bandwidth (obtained through context sensitive data gathering) and quick response time.
2008) so as to maximize their foveal vision, and this may be the most important intervention for these patients.
Results of a large number of studies have suggested that information overload in foveal vision induce decrements in peripheral performance (Abernethy & Leibowitz, 1971; Bursill, 1958; Leibowitz & Appelle, 1969; Mackworth, 1965; Provins & Bell, 1970).
The most frequent of these diseases is age-related macular degeneration (AMD), in which foveal vision is often impaired by a central scotoma that impairs vision of fine detail and causes problems with reading and recognizing faces.
When foveal vision is lost because of macula or optic nerve disease and a person looks "beyond" the object of regard to place the image on a viable area of the peripheral retina, it is considered eccentric viewing (Duke-Elder & Wybar, 1973; von Noorden, 1990).
Over a small portion of this range (approximately 3 log units), however, small changes in luminance are associated with large decrements in foveal vision.
To some extent, the latter is the result of an increasing reliance in feedback design on foveal vision -- an approach that fails to support pilots in tracking system-induced changes and events in parallel with performing concurrent flight-related tasks.
The result is in accordance with the hypothesis of Mourant and Rockwell (1972), based on their eye movement registrations, that novices first need foveal vision for lane keeping but, with increasing practice, learn to manage with more peripheral vision.