fourth ventricle


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Related to fourth ventricle: roof of fourth ventricle

ventricle

 [ven´trĭ-k'l]
a small cavity or chamber, as in the brain or heart.
ventricle of Arantius
1. the rhomboid fossa, especially its lower end.
fourth ventricle a median cavity in the hindbrain, containing cerebrospinal fluid.
ventricle of larynx the space between the true and false vocal cords.
lateral ventricle the cavity in each cerebral hemisphere, derived from the cavity of the embryonic tube, containing cerebrospinal fluid.
left ventricle the lower chamber of the left side of the heart, which pumps oxygenated blood out through the aorta to all the tissues of the body.
Morgagni's ventricle ventricle of larynx.
pineal ventricle an extension of the third ventricle into the stalk of the pineal body.
right ventricle the lower chamber of the right side of the heart, which pumps venous blood through the pulmonary trunk and arteries to the capillaries of the lung.
third ventricle a narrow cleft below the corpus callosum, within the diencephalon between the two thalami.

fourth ven·tri·cle

[TA]
a cavity of irregular tentlike shape extending from the obex rostralward to its communication with the sylvian aqueduct, enclosed between the cerebellum posteriorly and the rhombencephalic tegmentum anteriorly, with a rhomboidal floor (rhomboid fossa) and a tentlike roof; in its caudal part it is formed by the tela choroidea and the posterior medullary velum, in its middle part by the white matter of the cerebellum, and in its narrowing rostral part (recessus superior) by the anterior medullary velum. The fourth ventricle reaches its greatest width at the pontomedullary transition, where it expands laterally behind the cerebellar peduncles into the spoutlike lateral recess, and its greatest height at the fastigial recess, which reaches up into the cerebellar white matter. Direct communication of the brain's ventricle system and the subarachnoid space is established at the level of the fourth ventricle by a median opening in the tela choroidea, the medial aperture of the foramen of Magendie, which opens into the cerebellomedullary cistern, and on both sides by the lateral aperture or foramen of Luschka, which connects the lateral recess with the lateral cerebellomedullary cistern.

fourth ventricle

Etymology: ME, feower, four; L, ventriculus, little belly
a cavity with a diamond-shaped floor in the hindbrain, communicating below with the central canal of the spinal cord and above with the cerebral aqueduct of the midbrain. At the bottom of the ventricle are surfaces of the pons and medulla.

fourth ven·tri·cle

(fōrth ven'tri-kĕl) [TA]
A cavity of irregular shape extending from the obex rostrad to its communication with the sylvian aqueduct, enclosed between the cerebellum dorsally and the rhombencephalic tegmentum ventrally, having a rhomboid-shaped floor (rhomboid fossa) and a tentlike roof that in its caudal part is formed by the tela choroidea and the posterior medullary velum, in its middle part by the white matter of the cerebellum, and in its narrowing rostral part (recessus superior) by the anterior medullary velum. The fourth ventricle reaches its greatest width at the pontomedullary transition, where it expands laterally behind the cerebellar peduncles into the spoutlike lateral recess, and its greatest height at the fastigial recess, which reaches up into the cerebellar white matter. Direct communication between the ventricular system and the subarachnoid space is established at the level of the fourth ventricle by a median opening in the tela choroidea, the medial aperture of the foramen of Magendie, which opens into the cerebellomedullary cistern, and on both sides by the lateral aperture or foramen of Luschka, which connects the lateral recess with the interpeduncular cistern.

fourth ventricle

The centrally placed, rearmost of the four fluid-filled spaces in the brain. This tent-shaped cavity for cerebrospinal fluid lies immediately behind the PONS of the brainstem and immediately in front of the CEREBELLUM. It communicates with the aqueduct of the midbrain, in front, and with the central canal of the spinal cord, below.

ventricle

a small cavity or chamber, as in the brain or heart.
Enlarge picture
Ventricular system of the brain. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004

cardiac ventricle
the single fetal cardiac ventricle, formed by the looping of the bulboventricle; divided later by the growth of the interventricular septum as a projection from the wall of the bulboventricle.
fifth ventricle
the median cleft between the two laminae of the brain's septum lucidum.
fourth ventricle
a median, horizontally disposed, rhomboid cavity in the hindbrain, between the cerebellum and medulla, containing cerebrospinal fluid.
gastric ventricle
stomach.
laryngeal ventricle
a variably developed cavity of the larynx that opens into the laryngeal vestibule by a cleft between the vestibular and vocal folds; well developed in dogs and horses and especially certain apes.
lateral ventricle
the cavity in each cerebral hemisphere, derived from the cavity of the embryonic tube, containing cerebrospinal fluid and communicating with the third ventricle.
left ventricle
the lower chamber of the left side of the heart, which pumps oxygenated blood out through the aorta to all the tissues of the body.
pineal ventricle
an extension of the third ventricle into the stalk of the pineal body.
right ventricle
the lower chamber of the right side of the heart, which pumps venous blood through the pulmonary trunk and arteries to the capillaries of the lung.
third ventricle
a vertically disposed, ring-shaped space that contains cerebrospinal fluid and that communicates anteriorly with the lateral ventricles and caudally with the cerebral aqueduct within the diencephalon between the two thalami.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two cases of Dandy-Walker complex and Joubert syndrome and related disorders highlight the superiority of MRI in evaluating for vermian dysplasia or aplasia, the shape of the fourth ventricle, the insertion of the tentorium cerebelli and the presence of the pontine bulge.
According to expert opinion, unless the circulation of CSF is obstructed, which it is not in INPH, the fourth ventricle is relatively spared from dilation (Wilson & Islam, 2005).
Imaging studies have revealed midline masses occupying the fourth ventricle or cerebral aqueduct and commonly involving cerebellum (especially vermis) with a cerebellar attachment demonstrable at surgery for most tumors in the original series of Komori et al.
Although there are similarities between rosetted glioneuronal tumor of the fourth ventricle and DNT, these are perhaps outnumbered by differences.
Vestibular and oculomotor disturbances in pathology of the fourth ventricle.
This herniation involves the brainstem, fourth ventricle, and cerebellar vermis.
The third ventricle develops from the cavity in the midbrain (mesencephalon) and the fourth ventricle from the cavity in the hindbrain (rhombencephalon).
Perilesional edema with mass effect was noted, and there was compression of the fourth ventricle with mild obstructive hydrocephalus.
lateral ventricle, the third ventricle, and the fourth ventricle (Fig
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain obtained at the outside hospital reported a large posterior fossa tumor within the fourth ventricle as well as obstructive hydrocephalus.
1,4,9) In addition to increased ICP, impaired CSF circulation and absorption directly compromises the periventricular microcirculation, with subsequent local ischemia, a phenomenon of significant clinical impact, especially when the third and fourth ventricles are involved, in which case ischemic changes affect the adjacent brainstem.