founder effect


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found·er ef·fect

an unusually high frequency of a gene in a particular population derived from a small set of unrepresentative ancestors.

founder effect

n.
A random difference in allele frequencies of a population founded by a small group of organisms relative to the allele frequencies in the original population.

founder effect

the result of starting a new population with a low number of individuals (founders), so that their GENE POOL may not contain the same proportions of ALLELES for a particular LOCUS as in the original population. For example, instead of containing three alleles of the ABO BLOOD GROUP locus, Australian aborigines contain no B alleles and thus no Group B or Group AB individuals are produced, a situation probably caused by a ‘founder effect’. Such small founder populations are subject to RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT.

founder effect

extreme genetic drift that occurs when a new population is based on only a few individuals ('founders'). Called also founder principle.
References in periodicals archive ?
These data best support the second hypothesis, and indicate that the currant genetic diversity may be a consequence of postglacial long-distance dispersal events and subsequent founder effects.
The 14th-century founder effect was likely also the result of immigration, largely to Lithuania and the surrounding region.
That's when he understood why he couldn't confirm the founder effect.
It is interesting to point out that endogamy degree in Moroccan population is high, giving rise to the possibility of a founder effect of a mutation in a gene so far unknown.
Clinical patterns of human Y chromosomal diversity in continental Italy and Greece are dominated by drift and founder effects.
High prevalence of e novel mutation (2268 insT) of the thyroid peroxidase gene in Taiwanese patients with total iodide organification defect and evidence for a founder effect.
Another phenomena, the bottleneck effect is related to the founder effect and occurs when only a small portion of the original population survives to serve as the sole source of the population.
The great majority of affected alleles carry an A985G transition (causing Lys329Glu substitution), which seems to have been propagated by a founder effect [6].
In particular, dominant disease is exemplified in the case of Alzheimer's disease by presenilin 2 mutations that arose in German immigrants from the Volga river region in the 17th century, [1] and in PD by mutations in the LRRK2 protein that are linked to a founder effect dating back to the 2nd century, probably in Ashkenazi Jews.
This is attributed to the so-called founder effect.