language

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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.

lan·guage

(lang'gwăj),
The use of spoken, manual, written, and other symbols to express, represent, or receive communication.
[L. lingua]

language

[lang′gwij]
Etymology: L, lingua, tongue
1 a defined set of characters that, when used alone or in combinations, form a meaningful set of words and symbols that are used for communication.
2 a unified, related set of commands or instructions that a computer can use to perform work.

clinical etiquette

Professional comportment Medical practice The components of medical practice which, in addition to ethics and competence, define what it is to be a physician
Clinical etiquette
Bedside manner Avoid easy familiarity, be attentive of Pts needs, do not eat on rounds
Dress Conservative & appropriate
Grooming Clean, neat, unobtrusive
Language Respectful, at level of audience, non-use of vulgar vernacular or demeaning appellations, discretion regarding others' condition (JAMA 1988; 260:2559)  

lan·guage

(lang'gwăj)
The use of spoken, manual, written, and other symbols to express, represent, or receive communication.
[L. lingua]

lan·guage

(lang'gwăj)
Use of spoken, manual, written, and other symbols to express, represent, or receive communication.
[L. lingua]

language,

n a defined set of characters that is used to form symbols and words and the rules and connections for combining these into meaningful communications.
language, machine,
n a language designed for interpretation and use by a computer system without translation. Also called
machine code.

Patient discussion about language

Q. what is leukemia in lay person language, what causes it, what are the symptomes, and is it cancer

A. Leukemia is cancer of white blood cells. there are about 6-7 types of Leukemia i think...i'll have to check that one out. it basically means a white blood cell got mutated and started to multiply like crazy. causes severe problems. the types defer in which part of maturation it got cancerous. i hope i helped- if you still need more information, just ask! i'm here.

Q. Do I have to speak Chinese to study Chinese medicine? I’m thinking about studying Chinese medicine next year at a local college. Do I have to study Chinese before I start studying? Will it make any difference?

A. The main language of China is Mandarin. Hong Kong is Cantonese. Tawainese people speak (duh) Tawainese and Mandarin. Then you have like hundreds of other dialects from small provinces and island. I speak Mandarin which is the official language. A lot of Chinese People speak more than one dialect.

If I was you, I would go with Mandarin because it is becoming a standard in China. (Although Cantonese is very very popular in NYC, esp in Chinatown)

There are books at Barnes and Nobles that include audio lesson and video lessons, if you don't want to take a class, you can try that.

http://mandarin.about.com/
http://in.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=4E31423D4420774B&playnext=1&v=KSjpDj4s03k
http://learnchinesereviews.com/Learn-Chinese-Vocabulary-For-Family

More discussions about language
References in periodicals archive ?
Others have pointed out that Banerjee is associated with such vitriolic rhetoric but now has heightened the ante by spewing foul language from the dais.
He seems so shocked at his foul language that he can't decide if he meant to say it or not.
Several members of the public were present at the meeting and Coun Horncastle was alleged to have used foul language to Liberal Democrat county councillor Neil Bradbury, referring to his group or administration in a disparaging manner.
Obviously as a respectable newspaper, The Birmingham Post would never condone the use of foul language.
We excise foul language, excessive violence, and nudity.
They also note respectable hip-hop artists such as Common, Mos Def and Talib Kweli, which allows the reader to see hip-hop in a positive light and step away from the frequent misconceptions that connect hip-hop directly with foul language, drugs, crime and disrespect of women.
All comments must be approved by De La Torre -- he said he screens for foul language and links to pornography, but not whether the comment is positive or negative.
If you've ever wondered about the origins and use of foul language, check out Ruth Wajnryb's Expletive Deleted: A Good Look at Bad Language (Free Press, 2005).
are finding that foul Language is not only offensive, it can also be expensive.
Andre: "Fights, steals, runs away, does not respect authority, uses foul language, and lies.
BONO'S foul language has led to Irish-made war film Saving Private Ryan getting the bullet on US television.
A fascinating study of the man and the myth, even for non-sports fans, although caution is advised due to the frequent use of foul language.