foster care


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foster care

The care of individuals who cannot live independently (such as children, homeless families, or frail elderly people) in a group or private home.
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
A child who is in foster care and whose sibling is not currently in foster care.
The state, desperate to maintain its shrinking number of foster care providers, sometimes compromises standards for certification or licensing.
The developmental stage that children enter foster care is directly related to the type of mental health services that they receive (Garland, Landsverk, Hough, & Ellis-MacLeod, 1996; Leslie, Landsverk, Ezzet-Lofstrom, Tschann, Slymen, & Garland, 2000), their perspectives, the types of relationships that they establish and maintain with biological and foster parents, as well as their transition from foster care.
Students in foster care are also more likely to change schools than students in the comparison groups.
Such events that Swiis organises for young people in foster care reflect a commitment to much more than outstanding foster care.
At the Policy Summit in November, Kathleen Noonan from PolicyLab told the group, "The challenges we have seen with psychotropic medication use among children in foster care are really the call to arms for health care coordination for children in foster care given the serious safety concerns raised by their use in recent years.
According to the Foster Care Review South Carolina was the first state to pass a law allowing citizens from each community to become involved in the child welfare system by participating in case reviews of all children who spend longer than four consecutive months in foster care.
After being removed from often unstable, unsafe environments, many children and adolescents spend several years in a foster care system that itself is unstable.
According to our survey results, key factors contributing to the proportion of African American children in foster care included a higher rate of poverty, challenges in accessing support services, racial bias and distrust, and difficulties in finding appropriate adoptive homes.
A study that was published in the June 2008 issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry sought to determine the long-term effects of foster care on the physical and mental health of adults who had lived in private or public foster care systems.
The socio-emotional well-being of foster care youth requires a systemic response from professionals and volunteers in all communities.