bias

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Related to forward bias: Reverse bias

bias

 [bi´as]
1. (in a measurement process) systematic error.
2. any influence or action at any stage of a study that systematically distorts the findings.
3. (of a statistical estimator) the difference between the expected value of the estimator and the true parameter value.

bi·as

(bī'-as),
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

There is no imputation of prejudice, partisanship, or other subjective or emotional factor such as an investigator's desire to achieve a particular outcome. More than 100 varieties of bias have been described, but all fall into a small number of classes: 1. Systematic one-sided variation of measurements from the true value. SYN systematic error, instrumental error 2. Variation of statistical summary measures (means, rates, measures of association) from their true values as a result of systematic variation of measurements, other flaws in data collection, or flaws in study design or analysis. 3. Deviation of inferences from the truth as a result of flaws in study design, data collection, or the analysis or interpretation of results. 4. A tendency of procedures in study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, review or publication, to yield results or conclusions that depart from the truth. 5. Prejudice leading to the conscious or subconscious selection of study procedures that depart from the truth in a particular direction, or to one-sidedness in interpretation of results. This last form of bias can arise as a result of shoddy scientific methods or deliberate misrepresentation of the truth by investigators.

bias

[bī′əs]
Etymology: MFr, biais
1 an oblique or a diagonal line.
2 a prejudiced or subjective attitude.
3 (in statistics) the distortion of statistical findings from the true value. There can be many kinds of bias; some may be caused by the sampling process, but bias can be caused by other factors.
4 (in electronics) a voltage applied to an electronic device, such as a vacuum tube or a transistor, to control operating limits. See also detection bias.

bias

Epidemiology Deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such systematic deviation; any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that are systematically incorrect

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review, which can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bias,

n in statistics, the systematic distortion of a statistic caused by a particular sampling process.

bias

any systematic error in the design, conduct or analysis of a study which results in estimates which depart from true values. An unbiased study is free from systematic error. Many types of bias have been named, but three general types can be identified, selection bias, information bias and confounding. Selection bias is a systematic error in a study caused by the individuals selected into the study being different from the entire target population in an important way. See also berkson's bias. Information bias is a systematic error in a study caused by errors in the data which are collected in the study, or in the analysis of the data.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lower values of [Tau] are preferred because the charge injected into the I-region during forward bias can be removed quickly by recombinations resulting in the establishment of the reverse-biased high impedance state.
Assessment of experimental results indicated that when a forward bias is applied to the body, the direction in which current easily flows, whilst the effectiveness of the control increases, a limit exists after which performance degradation occurs.
For a forward bias current of 100 mA, the diode is equivalent to a short circuit ([R.
In addition, the latest ADSL transceivers, as well as other chips that are sensitive to negative-going transients, are further protected by the LCDA15-1's unidirectional conduction characteristic, which limits the amplitude of negative surges to a forward bias voltage.
2] However, as the method depends on the application of a forward bias to the gate of the FET, consideration needs to be given to the effect that forward gate currents will have on the effective gate resistance [R.
The forward conduction parameters of the FET also are adjusted to model the forward bias case for a typical 1 mm FET with 1 [Mu] m gate length.
At zero bias the impedance of the diode is high, greater than 1 k [Omega], but under forward bias, charge is injected into the l-layer that reduces the impedance to a level of 1 [Omega] typically.

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