formation


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formation

 [for-ma´shun]
1. the process of giving shape or form; the creation of an entity, or of a structure of definite shape.
2. a structure of definite shape.
chiasma formation the process by which a chiasma is formed; it is the cytologic basis of genetic recombination, or crossing over.
compromise formation in psychoanalysis a substituted idea or act representing and permitting partial expression of a repressed conflict.
concept formation the ability to organize a variety of information to form thoughts and ideas, a cognitive performance component in occupational therapy.
reaction formation a defense mechanism in which a person adopts conscious attitudes, interests, or feelings that are the opposites of unconscious feelings, impulses, or wishes. For example, a person may use revulsion or repugnance to defend against an unconscious desire or attraction.

for·ma·tion

(fōr-mā'shŭn), [TA]
1. A formation; a structure of definite shape or cellular arrangement.
2. That which is formed.
3. The act of giving form and shape.
Synonym(s): formatio (1) [TA]

formation

/for·ma·tion/ (for-ma´shun)
1. the process of giving shape or form; the creation of an entity, or of a structure of definite shape.
2. a structure of definite shape.

reaction formation  a defense mechanism in which a person adopts conscious attitudes, interests, or feelings that are the opposites of their unconscious feelings, impulses, or wishes.
reticular formation  any of several diffuse networks of cells and fibers in the spinal cord and brainstem; subdivided into the reticular formations of the spinal cord, medulla oblongata, mesencephalon, and pons.

formation

[fôrmā′shən]
1 a cluster of people who occupy and therefore define a quantum of space.
2 a structure, shape, or figure.

for·ma·tion

(fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Shape, configuration, arrangement; the way in which anything is formed.
2. That which is so formed.
3. The act of giving form and shape.
Synonym(s): formatio (1) [TA] .

formation

any of the main natural vegetation types extending over a large area that is created by the nature of the climate. Examples include tundra, steppe, rainforest and coniferous forest.

for·ma·tion

(fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. A structure of definite shape or cellular arrangement.
2. That which is formed.
3. The act of giving form and shape.

formation

1. the process of giving shape or form; the creation of an entity, or of a structure of definite shape.
2. a structure of definite shape.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way the Hangu Group consists ofLatest Cretaceous to Early Paleocene Hangu Formation and middle to Late Paleocene Sakaser Limestone.
This result "increases the likelihood of the formation of planetary systems resembling our own, because binary stars are the rule in our galaxy, not the exception," says Boss.
Retention helps to reduce manufacturing costs, and formation offers the opportunity to differentiate your paper from others through its optical and print properties (quality)," said Millan.
Castings were poured at 2500F (1371C), a temperature that previously was shown to induce lustrous carbon defect formation.
Called Autonomous Formation Flight, or AFF, the program controls the test aircraft using Global Positioning System satellite signals and measurements of aircraft movement.
Of course there were features of formation which were in need of change.
Social historians tooted in a structuralist analysis could well argue that these changing structural conditions were essential to the process of class formation that became visible in the 1919 strike.
Both Halas and Shaughnessy had great quarterbacks and runners, as well as outstanding blockers on the line--and none of their opponents had ever played against "A Modern T Formation with a Man in Motion.
The bulk volume of water data suggests coarser grained rocks for Hangu Formation in Sumari deep X-01 well.
If that's the ease, then star formation ought to be relatively sparse in the galactic fringes.
While these systems helped papermakers achieve high retention and drainage, he noted that paper formation could be jeopardized--especially on high speed top wire and twin wire formers.
There is no metallographic evidence that the electromagnetic field contributed to the formation of the orifice residue phases.