jurisprudence

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Related to formalism: structuralism, new criticism

jurisprudence

 [jo̳r″is-proo´dens]
the science of the law.
medical jurisprudence the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine; see also forensic medicine.

jur·is·pru·dence

(jūr'is-prū'dens),
The science of law, its principles and concepts.
[L. juris prudentia, knowledge of law]

jurisprudence

/jur·is·pru·dence/ (jldbomacr″is-proo´dens) the science of the law.
medical jurisprudence  the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine.

jurisprudence

[jo̅o̅′rispro̅o̅′dəns]
Etymology: L, jus, law, prudentia, knowledge
the science and philosophy of law. Medical jurisprudence relates to the interfacing of medicine with criminal and civil law.

jurisprudence

The science of law. Medical jurisprudence is another term for FORENSIC MEDICINE.

jur·is·pru·dence

(jūr'is-prū'dĕns)
Legal principles and concepts.

jurisprudence

(jŏŏr´isproo´dəns),
n the philosophy of law.
jurisprudence, dental (forensic dentistry),
n 1. the science that teaches the application of every branch of dental knowledge to the purposes of the law; this also includes the elucidation of doubtful legal questions.
n 2. the state laws and codes covering the legal limitations of the practice of the profession of dentistry.
n the science that applies the principles and practice of the different branches of medicine in the elucidation of doubtful questions in a court of justice. Also called
forensic medicine.

jurisprudence

the science of the law.

medical jurisprudence
the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The heart of the flowsheet is a table, so the application developer (who may be an end user) begins creating the ACE prototype by choosing a Table Visual Formalism.
wrested contract law from the formalism that defined it under williston
Coupled DEVS formalism describes a system as a network of components.
Subsequently, a formalism is shown that involves one uniqueness constraint on the role connected to object type X and two total role constraints.
So to the degree to which art theory should follow art, formalism, at least as a critical approach, gives way in the twentieth century to what for my purposes I call "contextualism.
Physics arrived at the Minkowski-Einstein formalism because of two very significant accidents of history, first that Maxwell's unification of electric and magnetic phenomena failed to build in the possibility of an actual 3-space, for which the speed of light is only c relative to that space, and not relative to observers in general, and 2nd that the first critical test of the Maxwell EM unification by Michelson using interferometry actually suffered a fundamental design flaw, causing the instrument to be almost 2000 times less sensitive than Michelson had assumed.
Formalism is so prevalent today that even filmmakers thought of as nitty-gritty realists, like Scorsese, frequently trade in self-conscious technique, be it the slow motion he used in his portion of "New York Stories" (1989), the tracking shots of "GoodFellas," or the color filters employed in "Cape Fear" (1991).
Suggesting that a properly theorized historical formalism augments the insights of New Historicism, she argues that the geographies of Shakespearean tragedy allow for the exploration of social issues and political crises.
As Hirsch shows, this belief in formalism leads to dull practice in summarizing, predicting, clarifying, and other mindless and unnecessary activities in the teaching of reading, but it does not lead to a knowledgeable person who reads widely and with deep comprehension.
The book uses the propagator formalism developed by Feynman and Stuckelberg rather than the calculation formalism of field theory.
Kawai's Tebura/Migaru ("empty hands/light in body") combines the formalism of Japanese dance and the spontaneity of postmodern devices.