forgetting

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for·get·ting

(fōr-get'ing),
Being unable to retrieve or recall information that was once registered, learned, and stored in short-term or long-term memory.

forgetting

An inability to remember or recognise things previously learned.

forgetting

Inability to remember something previously known or learned.
See: memory
References in periodicals archive ?
If you need to remove moss, mold, mildew or algae from an outdoor surface, I highly recommend 'Wet and Forget Outdoors,'" said Mark Donovan.
Since 2003, Bankers Life's Forget Me Not Days has helped provide more than $4.
We'll see how he gets on, but as far as Forget The Past is concerned, it is more likely that he will go for the Red Mills Chase at Gowran followed by the Ryanair Chase, instead of going for the Hennessy and the Gold Cup.
I haven't looked up all the available verb forms-forget, forgets, forgetting-but some relative of the word forgotten appears forty-three times in Pynchon's output.
It's normal to occasionally forget assignments, colleagues' names, or a business associate's telephone number and remember them tater.
And people forget that not all learning takes place in the classroom.
My biggest fear is that people are just going to forget.
He added, "Forget about taboos, forget about conservative ideas with respect to what you should tell young people about it.
Because of their iconic authority, Holocaust images became part of the public domain, recycled in the media, displayed in books, exhibitions, and museums, and integrated into artistic works (among the fifty-seven photos and documents reprinted in Remembering to Forget, the reader will find visual collages of Judy Chicago, Audrey Flack, and Robert Morris that illustrate Zelizer's point of the use of Holocaust photography in contemporary art).
Mr Blair was expected to say: "It is important that we never forget why we are doing this; never forget how we felt watching the planes fly into the towers; never forget those answerphone messages; never forget how we felt imagining how mothers told children they were about to die.
Businesses lose track of owners, owners forget about the assets, or the owner dies and the family is unaware of the property.