forepaw


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

forepaw

(fôr′pô′)
n.
The paw of an animal's foreleg.

forepaw

the distal part of the front limb, including the carpus, metacarpals and phalanges, as in dogs and cats.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Again those forepaws lashed and circled, again beasts leaped and darted in their frenzied efforts to evade him; some to succeed, two more to die.
Like all felines, according to biologist Mark Lotz, cats can walk very precisely because they directly register; that is, they place each hind paw (almost) directly in the paw print of the corresponding forepaw.
repetitive head and forepaw movements) than male rats, but only the males showed significant differences in amphetamine-induced stereotypy as a function of the experimental conditions.
Roger bends over and sketches four circles beside the mysterious holes with his thumb, a quick diagram of how the cat's foot falls, forepaw to hind paw, pattern close together.
The Pope has become, as in a fable, an android fox, sitting in a predatory crouch, his nose a long twitch, his large blotched hand a forepaw with a papal ring on one claw, his eyes acute and approving as he fixes them upon his grandson Ottavio Farnese.
When the happy juice starts flowing again, she waves a little forepaw in circles and shouts, "Who let the dogs out?
In a study of grizzly bears along the western Beaufort Sea coast, the average forepaw pad width of 62 adult males (> 7 yrs.
Because no animal model exists for causing pain in the forepaw, we chose to use irradiation near the lumbar sympathetic ganglia in CCI.
ROARING SUCCESS: This Staffordshire pottery model of a lion, circa 1860, cast from an earlier mould, has a forepaw on a ball, open mouth revealing a tongue and tail curled over its back.
Following a varying period of freezing, the rat then engages in repetitive approach-withdrawal reactions to and from the shock prod, and finally the rat begins to bury the prod with the bedding material using vigorous forepaw movements until the prod is typically covered (see Pinel & Wilkie, 1983, and Fanselow, Sigmundi, & Williams, 1987, for more complete descriptions and interpretations of the significance of this type of burying behavior).
The interphalangeal joints of the digits, the metacarpophalangeal and wrist in the forepaw and the ankle joint in the hind paw were each considered one category of joint.