foreign body reaction


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Related to foreign body reaction: foreign body granuloma

foreign

 [for´en]
1. not normal or usual to a place.
2. in immunology, pertaining to substances not recognized as “self” and capable of inducing an immune response.
foreign body reaction a granulomatous inflammatory response evoked by the presence of a foreign body in the tissues; a characteristic feature of this is the formation of foreign body giant cells (see giant cell).

for·eign bod·y re·ac·tion

(fōrin bodē rē-akshŭn)
Protective response by the immune system to a foreign body; includes chronic inflammation and granulomatous formations around the intrusive object.

foreign body reaction

A localized inflammatory response elicited by any material (e.g., a splinter or a suture) that would not normally be found within the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Foreign body reaction may develop immediately after implantation or may be delayed up to 10 years following surgery.
The pathology report revealed endometriosis, fascial scarring and foreign body reaction to synthetic mesh (Fig.
Symptomatic foreign body reaction to haemostatic alginate.
In a non-human trial* where KYPHON ActivOs 10 Bone Cement with Hydroxyapatite was implanted into eight rabbit femurs, new bone was seen to form on the surface of the cement without an intervening fibrous tissue layer, and no inflammatory foreign body reaction was observed.
The product is engineered to minimize foreign body reaction and maximize long-term patient comfort and quality of life with performance that lasts.
Laser-based systems have the potential advantage of minimal foreign body reaction.
I also think mature plants with pollen and seed heads can cause foreign body reactions and upset the health of the ear canal.
Foreign body reactions such as swelling and edema have reported with bioabsorbable implants in previous studies.
2,6-8) Autoimmune reactions can occur with body modifications, including edema, allergies (nickel in particular), inflammation, tissue overgrowth, sarcoid-like foreign body reactions, epidermal cysts (from penetration of epidermal cells into the dermis during piercing), cellulitis of the submandibular, sublingual and submental facial spaces (Ludwig's angina).
9,10 The histopathological differential diagnosis includes sarcoidosis, tuberculoid leprosy, granulomatous foreign body reactions and so on.