foreign accent syndrome


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A rare condition caused by a severe stroke or head injury (2 cases have been reported of individuals as a development problem) in which the person’s normal speech and inflections undergo an abrupt change, such that he or she sounds like they’re native to another language, country or culture.

foreign accent syndrome

A rare speech disorder that occurs suddenly after some strokes or brain injuries, in which a person maintains the ability to use vocabulary and diction but experiences a change in the rhythm and intonation of speech and sounds as if he or she were speaking with a foreign accent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nick Miller, one of the only foreign accent syndrome experts in the world, said: "There are some common threads that run through their stories.
What happens with foreign accent syndrome to the best of our understanding is that a very, very small part of the speech area is affected so that the normal intonation of speech gets altered," said Dr.
Foreign Accent Syndrome is thought to be brought on by a minor injury to the brain, according to the available research, affecting the center of the brain that governs speech and language.
Severity of psychosis can correlate with the magnitude of foreign accent syndrome, which can be used to assess a patient's progress and response to treatment.
Another Foreign Accent Syndrome case arose in 2006, when Linda Walker, 60, from Newcastle upon Tyne, found that after a stroke her distinctive Geordie twang had been replaced by an exotic mixture of Jamaican,French Canadian, Italian and Slovak.
Researchers at Oxford University have found that patients with Foreign Accent Syndrome have suffered damage to tiny areas of the brain that affect speech.
FOREIGN ACCENT SYNDROME This is one of the most intriguing neurological conditions reported and is quite often the result of a stroke or other brain injury event.
Lynda made headlines around the world after the Chronicle revealed that she is one of just a handful of people globally to suffer from the extremely rare Foreign Accent Syndrome.
The mum-of-two is one of just 60 people worldwide diagnosed with foreign accent syndrome.
Doctors say they suffered foreign accent syndrome, a condition which damages the part of the brain that controls speech and word formation.
Russell, a mum-of-two, has been diagnosed with the extremely rare Foreign Accent Syndrome, a one-in-250 million condition with just 60-recorded cases in the world.
The 60-year-old, from Fenham, Newcastle, had a rare case of Foreign Accent Syndrome, where patients wake up speaking differently after suffering brain injury.