ancestor

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an·ces·tor

(an'ses-tōr),
A person in the direct line of descent from which a subject of interest is derived (for example, parents or grandparents; but no collaterals or descendants).

ancestor

(ăn′sĕs′tər)
n.
1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
2. Biology The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.

ancestor

Etymology: L, antecessorem
one from whom a person is descended, through the mother or the father. The term assumes a direct line of descent, excluding collateral family members of previous generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ozouf, on the contrary, is out to vindicate the Revolution, its forebears and its agents (for example, Rousseau in Emile, or even the revolutionaries Amar and Chaumette) from this tarnishing accusation.
Current research places, instead, the age of the Earth at around four billion years, the phase of mammal life at around 600 million years and counting, the period of human forebears at somewhere around three to five million years, and the period of "civilization"--agriculture and towns--at perhaps 10,000 years.
He adds that the farmer who owned the land before he did and the farmer's forebears turned their backs on this "impossible land, which was not even good enough for grazing.
Immediately after being saved from Egyptian slavery - by God Himself no less - our Jewish forebears bemoaned their newly gained freedom: ``Better to die in the fleshpots of Egypt than to die in the desert.
Guest," 2004-, a series of small sheets of chain mail that mold themselves to the contours of their situation, draws on the rigorous but open-ended formal experimentation of forebears such as Eva Hesse and Barry Le Va but also sees the artist recuperate elements of her own earlier works made of similar materials.
Surely, modern, vigorous, youthful design of this sort must be just as relevant and desirable in our environment as the rather more staid contributions of our Victorian forebears.
She fears that the poverty and drunkenness and depression endemic to her family and forebears will dog her through her days.
Oh that our forebears of Agincourt and Alamein could be here to witness this proud moment.
Thus we must speculate about some of Lindsay's forebears, education, some of his travels, and friends, and even his appearance, although some images, including one on the book cover, are extant.
Our forebears felt compelled to leave the comparative safety of their own hearths and go on pilgrimage, a wearying, sometimes terrifying, life- threatening trudge along muddy rutted roadways that bore no resemblance whatsoever to a super-highway.
My own forebears, many serving in the armed forces, were involved over six generations in this imperial saga.
My friends were Catholic, and we were as bound by our common faith as we were by our exuberant youth, European forebears, and itchy masculinity.