forced feeding

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feeding

 [fēd´ing]
1. the taking of food.
2. the giving of food.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as providing nutritional intake for a patient who is unable to feed self.
artificial feeding feeding of a baby with food other than mother's milk.
bottle feeding in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as preparation and administration of fluids to an infant via a bottle.
breast feeding breastfeeding.
enteral tube feeding in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as delivering nutrients and water through a gastrointestinal tube.
forced feeding administration of food by force to those who cannot or will not receive it.
intravenous feeding administration of nutrient fluids through a vein; see also intravenous infusion and parenteral nutrition.
feeding procedures in the omaha system, any method of giving food or fluid, including breast, formula, intravenous, or tube.
supplemental feeding a planned additional food or nutrient that is added to the usual diet, often as a powder, formula, or tablet.
tube feeding see tube feeding.

forced feed·ing

, forcible feeding
1. giving liquid food through a nasal tube passed into the stomach;
2. forcing a person to eat more food than desired.
Synonym(s): forced alimentation
Eating disorders The self-administration of excess quantities of food in the context of the binge-purge complex
Human rights Forced alimentation The administration of nutrients against the will of the recipient

forced feed·ing

, forcible feeding (fōrst fēd'ing, fōr'si-bĕl)
1. Giving liquid food through a nasal tube that passes into the stomach.
2. Forcing a person to eat more food than desired.

forced feed·ing

, forcible feeding (fōrst fēd'ing, fōr'si-bĕl)
1. Giving liquid food through a nasal tube passed into the stomach.
2. Forcing a person to eat more food than desired.

forced

done by force.

forced feeding
see force feeding, intravenous alimentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The challenge is to make sense of Barnes's exhibitionism and her play with "spectacular confession" in terms of feminist politics and to examine her performance against and alongside the narratives and images of forcible feeding produced by British suffragettes.
Narratives of the experience of forcible feeding were transcribed in a variety of forms - speeches, letters to the editor, fliers, pamphlets, autobiographies, fictional accounts, and letters exchanged between suffragettes - but each account rehearses the gestures that create a reliable subgenre out of these texts and that position each individual account as representative.
Narratives and images of forcible feeding provide, if not a collapse of distance between spectator and spectacle, then a passage that takes spectator to spectacularity; and this passage is achieved through an intense (and perhaps masochistic) identification with the feminine martyr.
18) The narratives of forcible feeding are thus self-reproducing - each text engenders a new subject who will engender a new text.
The attempt of activists to educate women into the arena of performative activism is precisely what Barnes mocked in another essay published a year before her own encounter with forcible feeding, titled "Seventy Trained Suffragists Turned Loose on City.
Marking both her connection to and her difference from British suffragettes, Barnes's narrative of forcible feeding transforms the WSPU's discourse of forcible feeding that pins itself to "an authority of experience" into a discourse that emphasizes performance.
This discourse that blends the professional and the theatrical opens up a space where we can ask questions about the ways in which narratives of forcible feeding produced new activists and the ways in which Barnes's essay invites a critique of female spectacularity and spectatorship.
Both suffrage narratives of forcible feeding and Barnes's performance work in complex ways, and it would be a mistake to suggest that suffrage narratives are the problem to which Barnes's essay provides the cure.