forced vital capacity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to forced vital capacity: pulmonary function test, forced expiratory volume, Restrictive Lung Disease

capacity

 [kah-pas´ĭ-te]
the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
closing capacity (CC) the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure, the sum of the closing volume and the residual volume. See also closing volume.
decreased intracranial adaptive capacity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which intracranial fluid dynamic mechanisms that normally compensate for increases in intracranial volumes are compromised, resulting in repeated disproportionate increases in intracranial pressure in response to a variety of noxious and nonnoxious stimuli.
diffusing capacity see diffusing capacity.
forced vital capacity the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inhalation by exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius.
inspiratory capacity the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity heat capacity.
total lung capacity the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
 Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; V, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume. From Dorland's, 2000.
virus neutralizing capacity the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity (VC) see vital capacity.

forced vi·tal ca·pac·i·ty (FVC),

vital capacity measured with the subject exhaling as rapidly as possible; data relating volume, expiratory flow, and time form the basis for other pulmonary function tests, for example, flow-volume curve, forced expiratory volume, forced expiratory time, forced expiratory flow.

forced vital capacity

forced vital capacity

FVC Pulmonary medicine The volume of air exhaled with maximum effort and speed after a full inspiration; FVC is usually ↓ and thus is a major parameter measured in obstructive airways disease, a term that encompasses both asthma and COPD

forced vi·tal ca·pac·i·ty

(FVC) (fōrst vī'tăl kă-pas'i-tē)
Vital capacity measured with the subject exhaling as rapidly as possible.

forced vital capacity

The amount of air that can be expelled from the lungs by breathing out for as long as possible after a full inspiration. See also FORCED EXPIRATORY VOLUME.

forced vital capacity,

n a measure of the maximum rate of exhalation. Deviance from normative patterns based on age, size, and gender may indicate possible dysfunction.

capacity

the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.

carrying capacity
closing capacity (CC)
the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure. See also closing volume.
forced vital capacity
the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inspiration exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity
the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity
thermal capacity.
inspiratory capacity
the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inspiration, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity
maximal voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity
the amount of heat absorbed by a body in being raised 1°C.
total lung capacity
the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inspiration.
virus neutralizing capacity
the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity
the volume of gas that can be expelled from the lungs from a position of full inspiration, with no limit to duration of expiration; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is generally accepted that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and Forced vital capacity (FVC) are strong indicators of lung function, which decline due to obesity and sedentary life style [16, 17].
During a forced vital capacity maneuver, a normal loop appears, until toward the end of the loop, when an obstructive phase seems to tack on to end of the expiratory phase.
For example, forced vital capacity improved by an average of 4.
9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- A pre-specified, pooled subgroup sensitivity analysis from the two identically designed Phase III INPULSIS(TM) trials, presented today at the European Respiratory Society International Congress(ERS) evaluated the impact of the investigational drug nintedanib on reducing the decline in lung function, as measured by annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC), in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) based on the severity of lung function impairment at baseline.
That said, the as-needed treatment group had a smaller improvement in forced vital capacity (FVC), and there were some other potentially important differences in outcomes between groups.
The primary efficacy endpoint of the trial, also referred to as the AIM study ("Assessment of I2S in MPS II") was a composite endpoint of two clinical measures previously used to assess clinical benefit in MPS disorders - forced vital capacity and six-minute walk test.
Advanced disease is defined by a standard measure of forced vital capacity of less then 40 percent of predicted (FVC less than 40%).
The recommendation is based on results of a placebo-controlled study of 320 patients that examined safety and efficacy of Pulmozyme during a twelve-week period in cystic fibrosis patients with advanced lung disease defined by the standard measure of forced vital capacity less than 40% of predicted (FVC less than 40%).
The primary endpoint in these trials, the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC), was significantly reduced, indicating the rate of disease progression in the group receiving nintedanib was slower than those taking placebo.
1] and forced vital capacity [FVC]), compared with placebo, at all time points throughout the study.
INPULSIS(TM)-1 and -2, which involved a total of 1,061 people with IPF, met the primary endpoint: reduction in the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) over 52 weeks.