forced vital capacity


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capacity

 [kah-pas´ĭ-te]
the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.
closing capacity (CC) the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure, the sum of the closing volume and the residual volume. See also closing volume.
decreased intracranial adaptive capacity a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the state in which intracranial fluid dynamic mechanisms that normally compensate for increases in intracranial volumes are compromised, resulting in repeated disproportionate increases in intracranial pressure in response to a variety of noxious and nonnoxious stimuli.
diffusing capacity see diffusing capacity.
forced vital capacity the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inhalation by exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a specific quantity of a substance by one degree Celsius.
inspiratory capacity the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inhalation, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity maximum voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity heat capacity.
total lung capacity the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inhalation.
 Subdivisions of total lung capacity: TLC, total lung capacity; V, tidal volume; IC, inspiratory capacity; FRC, functional residual capacity; ERV, expiratory reserve volume; VC, vital capacity; RV, residual volume. From Dorland's, 2000.
virus neutralizing capacity the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity (VC) see vital capacity.

forced vi·tal ca·pac·i·ty (FVC),

vital capacity measured with the subject exhaling as rapidly as possible; data relating volume, expiratory flow, and time form the basis for other pulmonary function tests, for example, flow-volume curve, forced expiratory volume, forced expiratory time, forced expiratory flow.

forced vital capacity

forced vital capacity

FVC Pulmonary medicine The volume of air exhaled with maximum effort and speed after a full inspiration; FVC is usually ↓ and thus is a major parameter measured in obstructive airways disease, a term that encompasses both asthma and COPD

forced vi·tal ca·pac·i·ty

(FVC) (fōrst vī'tăl kă-pas'i-tē)
Vital capacity measured with the subject exhaling as rapidly as possible.

forced vital capacity

The amount of air that can be expelled from the lungs by breathing out for as long as possible after a full inspiration. See also FORCED EXPIRATORY VOLUME.

forced vital capacity,

n a measure of the maximum rate of exhalation. Deviance from normative patterns based on age, size, and gender may indicate possible dysfunction.

capacity

the power to hold, retain, or contain, or the ability to absorb; usually expressed numerically as the measure of such ability.

carrying capacity
closing capacity (CC)
the volume of gas in the lungs at the time of airway closure. See also closing volume.
forced vital capacity
the maximal volume of gas that can be exhaled from full inspiration exhaling as forcefully and rapidly as possible. See also pulmonary function tests.
functional residual capacity
the amount of gas remaining at the end of normal quiet respiration.
heat capacity
thermal capacity.
inspiratory capacity
the volume of gas that can be taken into the lungs in a full inspiration, starting from the resting inspiratory position; equal to the tidal volume plus the inspiratory reserve volume.
maximal breathing capacity
maximal voluntary ventilation.
thermal capacity
the amount of heat absorbed by a body in being raised 1°C.
total lung capacity
the amount of gas contained in the lung at the end of a maximal inspiration.
virus neutralizing capacity
the ability of a serum to inhibit the infectivity of a virus.
vital capacity
the volume of gas that can be expelled from the lungs from a position of full inspiration, with no limit to duration of expiration; equal to inspiratory capacity plus expiratory reserve volume.
References in periodicals archive ?
One hour after giving budesonide by nebulizer (week-2), metered dose inhaler (week-3), metered dose inhaler with spacer (week-4) and dry powder inhaler (week-5) there was highly significant increase in forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity ratio ([FEV.
10] could reduce the mean peak expiratory flow rate, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s values.
3,4] In a study by Meo SA et al [10], in the subjects exposed to crude oil spill into sea water , significant reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV(1)), forced expiratory flow (FEF(25-75%)) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) , however this impairment was reversible and lung functions parameters were improved when the subjects were withdrawn from the polluted air environment.
1] as a percentage of forced vital capacity, and a 16% decrease in the annual rate of decline in [FEF.
According to the researchers, the mean percentage predicted diffusing capacity was 46% and mean percentage predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) was 71%.
In 1980, forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were measured.
The forced vital capacity (FVC), the total amount of air a person can forcibly exhale, saw a faster decline of 4.
Forced vital capacity (FVC), or the total amount of air a person can forcibly exhale, declined 4.
com/blog/what-is-fev1-heres-what-you-need-to-know/) forced expiratory volume , which is how much air a person can force out in the first second of an exhale following a deep breath in; and forced vital capacity, which is the total air can be forced out from the lungs after a deep breath.
KD025 was well tolerated and demonstrated clinical benefit, with a median decline in forced vital capacity, a measure of lung function, of 48 mL at week 24, compared to a median decline of 175 mL in patients treated with best supportive care, an absolute difference of 127 mL and a relative difference of 73%.
The parameters of PFT taken into account were forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, and peak expiratory flow rate.
Forced vital capacity was significantly improved with formoterol over placebo at all study visits (3, 6, 9, and 12 months), but improvements from baseline in inspiratory capacity did not significantly differ from placebo.