forced laughter

forced laughter

Neurology
Pathological laughter, see there.
 
Vox populi
Compulsive laughter—laughter that typically occurs without a whimsical or jocular substrate, which is meant as a courtesy, to disguise anxiety or disagreement, or as an effort to interact with strangers.
References in classic literature ?
Minerva now made the suitors fall to laughing immoderately, and set their wits wandering; but they were laughing with a forced laughter.
She's turning on the forced laughter at his terrible quips and physically recoiled when he asked his new TV wife whether he had any "conjugal rights".
The uneasy combination of high jinks gone too far, forced laughter and the threat of impending horror persists throughout the play.
He said the forced laughter in a group could be therapeutic.
Look, I've accidentally come in wearing odd shoes," I verbally accosted them, my forced laughter enhancing the impression that I was becoming unhinged.
Forced laughter sounds were incorporated into all of this mayhem and Sharon egged us on as we bellowed out hearty 'ho's ha's and hees.
And, as arduous as such forced laughter might sound, it made everybody feel better.
Corticobulbar/pseudobulbar syndrome affects more than half of patients with vascular parkinsonism, taking the form of emotional lability and/or forced laughter.
Andy Gray and Ally McCoist have certainly perfected the art of forced laughter.
During a difficult radio interview with John Humphrys yesterday, IDS reacted with forced laughter to questions he could not answer.
The reason was the comments of guest speaker Diane Benussi, the celebrity divorce lawyer, who gave a guide on how not to get divorced - prompting strained grins and forced laughter from several corners of the room.
Imagine a world with no more forced laughter when you'd actually be enjoying watching the telly instead of cringing at the latest terrible joke from behind your cushion.