force

(redirected from force upon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

force

 [fors]
energy or power; that which originates or arrests motion or other activity.
Forces resulting from a fall are transmitted up to the spine through the long leg bones and pelvis. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
electromotive force the force that, by reason of differences in potential, causes a flow of electricity from one place to another, giving rise to an electric current.
reserve force energy above that required for normal functioning. In the heart it is the power that will take care of the additional circulatory burden imposed by bodily exertion.
shearing f's see shear.
van der Waals f's the relatively weak, short-range forces of attraction existing between atoms and molecules, which results in the attraction of nonpolar organic compounds to each other (hydrophobic bonding).

force (F),

(fōrs),
The external factor that causes a change in the state of rest, motion, or direction (or both), or shape of a fixed body.
[L. fortis, strong]

force

(fors) energy or power; that which originates or arrests motion. Symbol F.
electromotive force  that which causes a flow of electricity from one place to another, giving rise to an electric current. Abbreviated EMF. Symbol E.
occlusal force  the force exerted on opposing teeth when the jaws are brought into approximation.
reserve force  energy above that required for normal functioning; in the heart, the power that will take care of the additional circulatory burden imposed by exertion.
van der Waals forces  the relatively weak, short-range forces of attraction existing between atoms and molecules and arising from brief shifts of orbital electrons; it results in the attraction of nonpolar organic compounds to each other.
vital force  the energy that characterizes a living organism; most systems of complementary medicine seek to affect or use it.

force

Etymology: L, fortis, strong
1 energy applied so that it initiates motion, changes the speed or direction of motion, or alters the size or shape of an object.
2 a push or pull defined as mass times acceleration. If the force on an object produces movement, it is called dynamic. If the force does not produce movement, it is called static.
Biomechanics A quantifiable directional energy source
Physics A vector quantity—i.e., has both magnitude and direction—measured in newtons—N; the force of gravity acting on a 1 kg mass is 9.81 N; F=ma

force

(F) (fōrs)
1. That which tends to produce motion in a body.
2. Application of energy to initiate motion.

force

an interaction between two bodies, objects or agents which changes (or tends to change) motion either by contact or by action at-a-distance. May be a 'push' or a 'pull'. Note that a force changes the state of motion (including change from zero) but does not itself maintain an existing state of motion. net force the mathematical result of all the forces applied to an object or body, taking into account the size and direction of the forces. Measured in newtons (N). See also inertial movement.

force

effects of mass and acceleration exerted on or by a body (units of force = newtons)

force,

n unseen energy which influences living beings. See also dynamis.

force

(fōrs)
The external factor that causes a change in the state of rest, motion, or direction (or both), or shape of a fixed body.

force,

n any application of energy, either internal or external to a structure; that which initiates, changes, or arrests motion.
force and stress,
n the pressure forcibly exerted on the teeth and on their investing and supporting tissues that is detrimental to tissue integrity. In occlusal trauma, the production of lesions of the attachment apparatus depends on an interrelationship of the strength, duration, and frequency of the application of the force.
force, centrifugal,
n a force that tends to recede from the center.
force, chewing,
n the degree of force applied by the muscles of mastication during the mastication of food.
force, component of,
n 1. one of the factors from which a resultant force may be compounded or into which it may be resolved.
2. one of the parts of a force into which it may be resolved.
force, condensing,
n 1. the force required to compress gold-foil pellets, facilitating their cohesion, to fabricate or build up a gold-foil restoration.
2. the force required to compact or condense a plastic material (e.g., amalgam, wax).
force, constant,
n a continuous force or pressure applied to the teeth.
force, counter-dislodgement,
n pressure that comes into play when food is evenly distributed in the oral cavity so that contact between the maxillary and mandibular teeth is equalized on both sides during mastication.
force, denture-dislodging,
n an influence that tends to displace a denture from its intended position on supporting structures.
force, denture-retaining,
n an influence that tends to maintain a denture in its intended position on its supporting structures.
force, electromotive,
n the difference in potential in a roentgen-ray tube between the cathode and anode; usually expressed in kilovolts.
force, intermittent,
n a force or pressure (applied to the teeth) that is alternated with a period of passiveness or rest.
force, line of,
n the direction of the power exerted on a body.
force, masticatory,
n the force applied by the muscles attached to the mandible during mastication.
force, occlusal (occlusal load),
n 1. the result of muscular forces applied on opposing teeth.
2. the force transmitted to the teeth and their supporting structures by tooth-to-tooth contact or through a bolus of food or other interposed substance.
force, shear,
n commonly employed as a calculation of the physical stress a material can bear, it refers to the type of force that is expressed parallel to the face of an object.
force, tensile,
n the type of force manifested in an extension of an object itself. A stretched rubber band is an example of tensile force.

force

energy or power; that which originates or arrests motion or other activity.

electromotive force
the force that, by reason of differences in potential, causes a flow of electricity from one place to another, giving rise to an electric current.
moment of force
the effect of a force exerted on a lever and about a fixed point.
reserve force
energy above that required for normal functioning. In the heart it is the power that will take care of the additional circulatory burden imposed by bodily exertion.
shearing force
a force exerted perpendicularly to a horizontal surface.
Van der Waals f's
the relatively weak, short-range forces of attraction existing between atoms and molecules, which results in the attraction of nonpolar organic compounds to each other (hydrophobic bonding).

Patient discussion about force

Q. How to get a bipolar person to get treatment, if refuses to carry this condition? My girlfriend’s mom told me once by phone that my girlfriend was bipolar. I started doing a little research and learned it is difficult to live with this sickness. I don't want to brake up but my safety is fading out now

A. Unless you know for definite that your gf has actually been properly diagnosed for this disorder, you can't tell her to get treatment for a disorder that her mum thinks she may supposedly have. I think you need to have a big long chat with your girlfriend about this and show her your encouragement and support, rather than fear about your safety. She needs someone like you to understand what it is like, and it seems that her bipolar is not an extreme case, otherwise you would have known right away with her behavior. It's caused my having major highs and lows, and if she has been properly diagnosed, encourage her to get the treatment as you care for her and want her to get better!

More discussions about force
References in periodicals archive ?
Likewise, Section 3 provides that: "Any person who is found guilty of carnapping, shall, regardless of the value of the motor vehicle taken, be punished by imprisonment of not less than twenty (20) years and one (1) day and not more than thirty (30) years, when the carnapping is committed without violence against or intimidation of persons or force upon things; and by imprisonment for not less than thirty (30) years and one (1) day and not more than forty (40) years, when the carnapping is committed by means of violence against or intimidation of any person, or force upon things; and the penalty of life imprisonment shall be imposed when the owner, driver, or occupant of the carnapped motor vehicle is killed in the commission of the carnapping.
MedImmune will begin selling CytoGam(TM) through its own sales force upon execution of a definitive agreement anticipated later this year.
In essence, the objective is to exert a positive, supportive and controlling force upon overall marketing strategy and performance but not to get involved in the day-to-day operations and decisions.
The convoy will also be assisted by the Boston city police force upon its arrival at the gates of Fenway Park, where the DHL delivery trucks will be received by a member of the Red Sox management team.
The legal acts have been adopted by written procedure and will enter into force upon publication in the EU Official Journal of 30 October.
The agreement will enter into force upon its ratification by Parliaments of two countries.
Further optimizing its operations, IT managers no longer need to forecast the future changes in programming needs, data traffic expansion, emerging digital technology or the resultant changes that these would force upon its fiber optic infrastructure.