Foraminifera

(redirected from foraminifer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to foraminifer: Foraminifera

Fo·ram·i·nif·e·ra

(fō-ram'i-nif'ĕr-ă, for'ă-mi-nif'er-ă),
A subclass of Rhizopoda possessing anastomosing pseudopodia; these form a network around the cell that usually develops into a complex calcareous shell; an important component of the ocean bottom and of rockbeds overlying oil deposits.
[L. foramen, aperture, + fero, to carry]

Foraminifera

amoeboid PROTOZOANS that possess chitinous, calcareous or siliceous shells that are usually many-chambered. Calcareous Foraminifera are the main constituent of chalk.
References in periodicals archive ?
The classification of foraminifers in this study follows Loeblich and Tappan (1987, 1994), Saito et al.
The fossils commonly observed in this part are benthonic and planktonic foraminifers.
Foraminifers of Mayaguez and Anasco Bays and its surroundings.
Microbiostratigraphical studies led to identify 54 genera and 86 species of fossils which most of them are foraminifers and algas.
These finds are limited to long-ranging trace fossils, rare fragments of Platysolenites and agglutinated foraminifers Luekatiella (Kala et al.
Also, there are rarely planktonic foraminifers including non-keeled Globigerinids.
Groups distinctive for different ecosystems, especially indicating terrestrial, neritic and pelagic marine environments, are land plants, phytoplankton, foraminifers, sponges, corals, arthropods, cephalopods, echinoderms, brachiopods, bryozoans, conodonts and fishes.
These new insights come from the chemical analysis of exceptionally well preserved fossils of marine micro-organisms called foraminifers, discovered in marine rocks from New Zealand.
This biota, referred to as a Bryonoderm-extended assemblage, indicates much colder temperate conditions than those evidenced by the abundant algae and foraminifers (Chloroforam assemblage) of the older Raanes Formation and Belcher Channel Formation.
Since then, volume after volume has appeared, dealing with trace fossils, spores, conodonts, sponges, plants, graptolites, foraminifers, brachiopods and, yes, more trilobites (according to some, too many, but never mind).