forage

(redirected from foraging)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

for·age

(fōr-ahzh'),
The operation of cutting a channel by surgical diathermy through an enlarged prostate.
[Fr. boring]

forage

(for′ăj) [Fr., fourrage, fodder]
1. Creation of a channel through an enlarged prostate by use of an electric cautery. This technique may be used in other tissues.
2. Fodder for cattle or horses or cattle.
3. A search for food of any kind.

forage

strictly speaking, dried winter feed, usually hay. Used also to include ensilage and even pasture so that the term becomes synonymous with roughage. See also bunk forage.

forage mites
forage poisoning
the forage contains a toxic agent. See food poisoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Number of foraging large charadriids was significantly greater in bayshore habitat in comparison to lakeshore (P = 0.
Barclay RMR Chruszcz BJ and Rhodes M (2000) Foraging behaviour of the large-footed myotis, Myotis moluccarum (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) in south-eastern Queensland.
We observed foraging Eastern Phoebes in south-central Texas (Bastrop, Colorado, Hays, Travis, and Williamson counties) in state, county, and city parks from November 2004 through February 2005.
I recorded the foraging ecology of Polylepis bird species at three sites in the Cordillera Vilcanota mountain range (Fig.
We conducted continuous focal scans on 64 American Robins (38 adult scans and 26 juvenile scans) foraging for mulberries on trees scattered throughout the 27.
We examined the foraging biology of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers with particular emphasis on differences in foraging position and behavior of individuals differing in gender and social status.
com TRADITIONAL FORAGING ON GOWER MATT Powell offers guided bass lure angling as well as foraging, with many who attend his courses basing themselves at the Quabs cabin at Parc Le Breos on the Gower peninsula.
A mathematical pattern of movement called a Levy walk describes the foraging behaviour of animals from sharks to honey bees, and now for the first time has been shown to describe human hunter-gatherer movement as well.
Now that April has arrived things are starting to pick up on the foraging front though.
The difference in foraging-vigilance optima between age classes may be particularly pronounced in species that forage on prey that move rapidly in three-dimensional space (Marchetti and Price, 1989) and this requires complex foraging behavior such as hawking of flying insects (Davies, 1976), plunge-diving (Burger and Gochfeld, 1983), or foraging near large ungulates (Burger and Gochfeld, 1989).
Black-capped Chickadees also occur in this area and regularly use these habitats for nesting and foraging.