footprinting


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foot·print·ing

(fut'print-ing),
A method for determining the area of DNA covered by protein binding; accomplished by nuclease digestion of the protein-DNA complex followed by analysis of the region of DNA protected by the interaction with protein.

footprinting

a method for determining the location of binding between a protein and a DNA molecule. The technique involves nuclease digestion of the unbound and therefore unprotected sequences of DNA. The protected DNA fragment that remains can be identified electrophoretically.
A method for detecting sites of interaction between regulatory or promoter proteins and DNA (DNA footprinting) or DNA and RNA (RNA footprinting)

footprinting

a technique used to identify the region of a DNA molecule to which a specific PROTEIN binds. The DNA sequence covered by the protein is protected from digestion by a NUCLEASE, and this protective phenomenon can be exploited to locate precisely the protein-binding site. DNA in the absence of the protein is digested with the nuclease to give a ladder of DNA fragments, following ELECTROPHORESIS. However, in the presence of bound protein the DNA is not cut at all potential sites by the nuclease. Certain PHOSPHODIESTER bonds in the DNA are protected by the bound protein. Thus the ladder of DNA fragments is incomplete. The absent fragments indicate the position of the ‘footprint’ in the ladder.

footprinting

a technique for identification of protein-binding regions on DNA, based on the principle that segments with bound protein are resistant to endonuclease activity and t`hese can be demonstrated as missing bands in gel electrophoresis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the FBI continues to advocate and encourage footprinting infants at birth, believing that this process represents a reliable, expeditious, and cost-efficient method for establishing probable personal identity.
A common misconception exists today that DNA genotyping represents a means of identification superior to fingerprinting or footprinting.
The nearest FBI field office or other local law enforcement agency can provide a fingerprint expert to train hospital personnel in footprinting procedures.