foot-and-mouth disease


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foot-and-mouth dis·ease (FMD),

a highly infectious disease of worldwide distribution and great economic importance, occurring in cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and all wild and domestic cloven-hoofed animals caused by a picornavirus (genus Aphthovirus) and characterized by vesicular eruptions in the mouth, tongue, hoofs, and udder; humans are rarely affected.
Synonym(s): aftosa

foot-and-mouth disease

n.
An acute, highly contagious degenerative viral disease of cattle and other cloven-hoofed animals, characterized by fever and the eruption of vesicles around the mouth and hooves. It is usually not fatal. Also called hoof-and-mouth disease.

foot-and-mouth disease

an acute extremely contagious rhabdovirus, specifically vesicular stomatitis virus, infection, primarily of cloven-hooved animals. It is characterized by the development of ulcers on the skin around the mouth, on the mucous membrane in the mouth, and on the udders. Horses are immune. The virus is transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals or their secretions or with contaminated milk, although this is rare. It should not be confused with hand-foot-and-mouth disease, which is caused by a different virus (coxsackie A). Symptoms and signs in humans include headache, fever, malaise, and vesicles on the tongue, oral mucous membranes, hands, and feet. Generalized pruritus and painful ulcerations may occur; however, the temperature soon falls, the lesions subside in about a week, and total healing without scars is complete by 2 or 3 weeks. Treatment is symptomatic. Also called aphthous fever. See also picornavirus.
An infection of cloven-hoofed barnyard beasts (cattle, goats, pigs, sheep) or rarely, humans, by a picornavirus, genus Aphthovirus, or by a rhabdovirus, vesicular stomatitis, which has an RNA clothed in a naked icosahedral nucleocapsid

foot-and-mouth dis·ease

(fut mowth di-zēz)
Highly infectious disease of worldwide distribution and great economic importance, occurring in cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and all wild and domestic cloven-hoofed animals caused by a picornavirus and characterized by vesicular eruptions in the mouth, tongue, hoofs, and udder; humans are rarely affected.

foot-and-mouth disease

an extremely contagious, acute disease of all cloven-footed animal species. It is caused by members of the genus Aphthovirus in the family Picornaviridae which has seven serotypes and at least 80 subserotypes. Clinically there is a syndrome of fever and vesicular lesions in the mouth and around the coronets. The first sign is often lameness. Spread is very rapid and the virus is very resistant so that the infection is readily transmitted on inanimate objects. The virus can also be transmitted over several miles by wind-borne carriage of aerosol infection from respiratory excretion of the virus. It is not fatal except occasionally in calves and young piglets, where it also produces a myocarditis, but herd productivity is reduced disastrously. A disease notifiable to the OIE (see Table 24). Controlled with a slaughter eradication policy in most countries, but the outbreak in the United Kingdom in 2001 indicates that this policy has limited public support. Called also FMD, aftosa.

foot-and-mouth disease m. d. virus (FMDV)
a picornavirus, seven serotypes, at least 80 subtypes, affecting all ruminants, pigs, hedgehogs and elephants. The virus is extremely acid-labile but survives well in offal, particularly glandular tissue and bone marrow which were commonly fed as garbage to pigs resulting in outbreaks of disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
The non-structural polyprotein 3ABC of Foot-and-mouth disease virus as a diagnostic antigen in ELISA to differentiate infected from vaccinated cattle.
Multiple sources of serotypes O, A, and Asia 1 of foot-and-mouth disease viruses, which have caused recent outbreaks in eastern Asia, are endemic to Southeast Asia (13).
C6 as the cell substrate for vaccines against such an important concern as foot-and-mouth disease as further confirmation of the strength of PER.
Under the Outbreaks: In The News header, visitors will find links to articles about biodefense and epidemiological tracking related to specific diseases including influenza, monkeypox, SARS, West Nile virus, and foot-and-mouth disease, which have recently been capturing headlines and public attention around the globe.
There wasn't a significant fall in Cryptosporidium incidence in areas of Scotland free of foot-and-mouth disease, where the response to the outbreak was less aggressive.
Foot-and-mouth disease is also called hoof-and-mouth disease.
The animal was seen to have blisters on its body - but the symptoms could be due to foot-and-mouth disease or swine vesicular disease.
Hunting was suspended in February after the first cases of foot-and-mouth disease were discovered.
She had no way of knowing that in a little more than seven hours, her innocent, apparently small act of smuggling would lead to the most devastating outbreak of a contagious disease in American livestock since an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in 1929.
HFMD is a different disease than foot-and-mouth disease of cattle, sheep, and swine.
Farm Shows Step Up Precautions to Prevent the Spread of Foot-and-Mouth Disease
Outbreaks of mad cow disease and foot-and-mouth disease in Europe and parts of Latin America have led to a flurry of trade restrictions.