food dye

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Related to food colour: Food colors

food dye

Any of a number of natural (e.g., saffron) or synthetic (e.g., FD&C Yellow No. 5—tartrazine) dyes added to foods to alter the colour; food dyes may cause allergic reactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to an estimate about 1000 tonnes of certified food colours are used in the USA alone.
The industrial dyes are used for colouring plastics and dyeing fabrics, the pigments are used by the paint industry which contain injurious chemicals like cobalt, arsenic, mercury and their compounds and the last are food colours.
At present, according to the Pure Food Rules of 1965, eighteen synthetic food colours such as Food blue, Food Violet, Food Green, Food Yellow, Food Brown, Food Chocolate Brown, Food Red and Food Black and five natural food colours are permitted food colours in Pakistan.
According to these Rules, food colours should not be added to the other category of foods not mentioned in this list.
However, in actual practice, other nonpermitted synthetic dyes like auramine, metanil yellow, lead chromate, rhodamine, sudan-3 and 4, orange-2 and Malachite green, which pose serious health hazards, as they are mutagenic and potential carcinogens, are being used as food colours in the market.
This Frost & Sullivan research service titled Strategic Analysis of European Natural and Nature-identical Food Colours Market provides an overview of the trends, market drivers, restraints and challenges influencing the polyols market.
Natural Food Colours Ride on Health Benefits to Steal the March on Synthetic Colours
The elevation of the status of natural food colours from mere colourants to health promoting ingredients and rising awareness of their bioactive properties have further increased their demand.
Popularity of Natural Food Colours Encourage Producers to Widen Application Base
The food industry alone accounts for a 70 percent share of the natural food colours market compared to 27 percent for soft drinks and just 3 percent for alcoholic beverages according to the Mintel and Leatherhead Food Research report.
Overall, the global market for food colours was worth an estimated USD1.