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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

med·i·cine

(med'i-sin),
1. A drug.
2. The art of preventing or curing disease; the science concerned with disease in all its relations.
3. The study and treatment of general diseases or those affecting the internal parts of the body, especially those not usually requiring surgical intervention.
[L. medicina, fr. medicus, physician (see medicus)]

medicine

/med·i·cine/ (med´ĭ-sin)
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the treatment of disease by nonsurgical means.

alternative medicine  see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine  that dealing with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in aviation.
Chinese herbal medicine  a highly complex system of diagnosis and treatment using medicinal herbs, one of the branches of traditional Chinese medicine. Herbs range from the nontoxic and rejuvenating, used to support the body's healing system, to highly toxic ones, used to treat disease.
clinical medicine 
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine , complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine. Such practices may be described as alternative, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, not symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are controversial and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine  the medical specialty dealing with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment.
environmental medicine  that dealing with the effects of the environment on humans, including rapid population growth, water and air pollution, travel, etc.
experimental medicine  the study of diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine  see under practice.
folk medicine  the use of home remedies and procedures as handed down by tradition.
forensic medicine  medical jurisprudence.
geographic medicine 
group medicine  the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
herbal medicine  herbalism.
holistic medicine  a system of medicine which considers man as an integrated whole, or as a functioning unit.
internal medicine  that dealing especially with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine  medical jurisprudence.
mind-body medicine  a holistic approach to medicine that takes into account the effect of the mind on physical processes, including the effects of psychosocial stressors and conditioning, particularly as they affect the immune system.
naturopathic medicine  naturopathy.
nuclear medicine  the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.
occupational medicine  the branch of medicine dealing with the study, prevention, and treatment of workplace-related injuries and occupational diseases.
orthomolecular medicine  a system for the prevention and treatment of disease based on the theory that each person's biochemical environment is genetically determined and individually specific. Therapy involves supplementation with substances naturally present in the body (e.g., vitamins, minerals, trace elements, amino acids) in individually optimized amounts.
patent medicine  a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription; formerly used for quack remedies sold by peddlers.
physical medicine  physiatry.
preclinical medicine 
2. the first two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
preventive medicine  science aimed at preventing disease.
proprietary medicine  a remedy whose formula is owned exclusively by the manufacturer and which is marketed usually under a name registered as a trademark.
psychosomatic medicine  the study of the interactions between psychological processes and physiological states.
rehabilitation medicine  the branch of physiatry concerned with the restoration of form and function after injury or illness.
socialized medicine  a system of medical care controlled by the government.
space medicine  the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by humans in space.
sports medicine  the branch of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletics, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
traditional Chinese medicine  (TCM) the diverse body of medical theory and practice that has evolved in China, comprising four branches: acupuncture and moxibustion, herbal medicine, qi gong, and tui na. In all of these, the body and mind are considered together as a dynamic system subject to cycles of change and affected by the environment, and emphasis is on supporting the body's self-healing ability. Fundamental to TCM are the yin and the concept of basic substances that pervade the body: qi, jing, and shen, collectively known as the three treasures, and the blood (a fluid and material manifestation of qi) and body fluids (which moisten and lubricate the body).
travel medicine , travelers' medicine the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine  the branch of medicine concerned with diseases of the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine  the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

medicine

(mĕd′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
1.
a. The science and art of diagnosing and treating disease or injury and maintaining health.
b. The branch of this science encompassing treatment by drugs, diet, exercise, and other nonsurgical means.
2. The practice of medicine.
3. A substance, especially a drug, used to treat the signs and symptoms of a disease, condition, or injury.
4.
a. Shamanistic practices or beliefs, especially among Native Americans.
b. Something, such as a ritual practice or sacred object, believed to control natural or supernatural powers or serve as a preventive or remedy.

medicine (med)

Etymology: L, medicina, art of healing
1 a drug or a remedy for illness.
2 the art and science of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease and the maintenance of good health.
3 the art or technique of treating disease without surgery. Two major divisions of medicine are academic medicine and clinical medicine. Some of the many branches of medicine are environmental medicine, family medicine, forensic medicine, internal medicine, and physical medicine. -medical, adj.

medicine

Medspeak
(1) The art and science of maintaining health; recognising, understanding, preventing, diagnosing, alleviating, managing and treating diseases, injuries, disorders and deformities in all their relations that affect the human body in general, including surgery.
(2) A popular term for internal medicine.

Therapeutics
A drug or therapeutic agent.

medicine

Medtalk A discipline devoted to understanding and treating disease, often referring to physical and chemical mechanisms. Related terms are Addiction medicine, Aerospace medicine, Behavioral medicine, Botanical medicine, Boutique medicine, Cardiovascular medicine, Chinese herbal medicine, Community medicine, Complementary medicine, Cookbook medicine, Correctional medicine, Critical care medicine, Defensive medicine, Electromedicine, Emergency medicine, Energy medicine, Environmental medicine, Ethnic traditional Chinese medicine, Evidence-based medicine, Evolutionary medicine, Field medicine, Folk medicine, Fringe medicine, Gender-specific medicine, Global medicine, Herbal medicine, Humanistic medicine, Integrative medicine, Japanese medicine, Legal medicine, Low yield medicine, Mail-order medicine, Mainstream medicine, Mickey Mouse medicine, Military medicine, Mind/body medicine, Molecular medicine, Mountain medicine, Nuclear medicine, Occupational medicine, Organized medicine, Orthomolecular medicine, Palliative medicine, Patient-oriented medicine, Pain medicine, Performing arts medicine, Preclinical medicine, Preventive medicine, Psychosomatic medicine, Rehabilitation medicine, Schüssler's biochemical system of medicine, Social medicine, Socialized medicine, Space medicine, Sports medicine, Telemedicine, Traditional medicine, Traditional Chinese medicine, Transfusion medicine, Translational medicine, Travel medicine, Tropical medicine, Vibrational medicine, Wilderness medicine Therapeutics A drug or therapeutic agent See Black medicine, Natural medicine, Outdated medicine, Patent medicine, Pink medicine.

med·i·cine

(med'i-sin)
1. A drug.
2. The art of preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease; the science concerned with disease in all its aspects.
3. The study and treatment of general diseases or those affecting the internal parts of the body, especially those not usually requiring surgical intervention.

medicine

1. The branch of science devoted to the prevention of disease (hygiene), the restoration of the sick to health (therapy) and the safe management of childbirth (obstetrics). Medicine is a scientific discipline but the practice of medicine involves social skills and the exercise of sympathy, understanding and identification, not normally demanded of a scientist.
2. Medical practice not involving surgical operative intervention. In this sense, medicine and surgery are distinguished.
3. Any drug given for therapeutic purposes.

medicine

treatment of disease
  • alternative medicine non-orthodox medicine, e.g. acupuncture, herbalism, aromatherapy, reflexology

  • community medicine incidence, prevalence and effects of diseases within specific population groups

  • forensic medicine diagnostic skills applied to crime detection

  • nuclear medicine investigation, diagnosis and treatment of disease using radionucleotides

  • physical medicine study and treatment of disease by mechanical therapies

  • preventive medicine disease prevention and health/wellness promotion by control of causes of disease

medicine,

n the art and science of preventing, diagnosing, treating, and managing illness.
medicine family/clan,
n the family or a group of families of healers within each Native American Nation who pass along their knowledge intergenerationally. These healers may have formal societies or work informally.
medicine, allopathic,
n method of medical treatment in which drugs are administered to counter symptoms of the disease.
medicine, alternative,
n therapeutic practices not considered integral to conventional medicine. Used in-stead of conventional therapies.
medicine, anthroposophical,
n holistic, humanistic model of health care that combines allopathic medicine with the spiritual teachings of Rudolf Steiner. Also called
Anthroposophically Extended Medicine (AEM).
medicine, arts,
n the study of relationship between human health and the arts, in which arts and artistic activities are explored for their therapeutic benefits.
medicine, behavioral,
n combined treatment strategies that employ both cognitive-behavioral therapies and meditation.
medicine, biochemic (bī·ō·keˑmik meˈ·dis·in),
n a therapy designed to correct a disparity of essential inorganic salts in an organism by using low-potency (homeopathic) tissue salts. See also Schüssler cell salts and tissue salts.
medicine, China's traditional,
n ancient healing system with references to the five cosmic elements that dates to 3000 BCE. It includes the use of herbal treatments, massage (tuina), acupuncture, and qi gong to maintain the balance of qi, the vital energy in the body. Also called
traditional medicine of China. See also qi gong and qi.
medicine, complementary,
n therapeutic practices not considered integral to conventional medicine. Used in conjunction with conventional therapies. Often used interchangeably with the term
alternative medicine, encompasses the wide array of therapies not generally offered by MDs and not usually covered by health insurance. Complementary is considered a more accurate term because in practice, patients do not replace allopathic treatment but instead supplement it with complementary medicine.
medicine, constitutional,
n homeopathic categorization based on Grauvogl's 1865 definition of oxygenoid, hydrogenoid, and carbonitrogenoid constitutions. Similar alterations occur within each constitution during breathing and in blood. The three constitutions were later replaced by Nebel's carbonic, fluoric, and phosphoric constitutions. See also constitution, constitutional prescribing, morphology, and typology.
medicine, conventional,
n the model of currently established Western medicine. This paradigm was designated as
conventional because of its prevalence. What is considered conventional is always in flux. See also allopathy; model, biomedical; and orthodox.
medicine, eclectic,
n healing system that employs a combination of approaches. See also homeopathy, complex; homeopathy, pluralist; and homeopathy, unicist.
medicine, empirical,
n practice of medicine based on experience rather than theory.
medicine, energy,
n a group of medical approaches that use bio-logical, psychological, and spiritual “energy” for diagnosis, treatment and to promote health and well-being. The term
energy in energy medicine is understood in different terms depending upon the context; therefore energy medicine includes many different modalities. See also acupuncture, bio-feedback, homeopathy, meditation, Qi gong, reiki, and therapeutic touch.
medicine, environmental,
n medical practice that focuses on environmental exposures and health. The environment of the patient is tested for disease precipitators; living habits are evaluated; and a treatment protocol is created based on the findings.
medicine, evidence-based,
n a medical approach in which the physician or therapist evaluates the clinical evidence supporting or refuting the claims of a particular modality as a basis for making care decisions.
medicine, folk,
n any complementary/alternative system of medicine derived from oral, traditional, or unofficial sources (including spiritual practices and beliefs)—often though not exclusively associated with specific ethnic groups.
medicine, frontier,
n classification of those alternative and complementary therapies for which no biomedical explanation currently exists.
medicine, functional,
n name for an approach in medicine that aims at preventing illness and at optimizing physical and mental health function, often with supplements and lifestyle modification.
medicine, Galenic,
n.pr the medicine of Galen, the second century Greek physician whose theories were authoritative in Europe for 1400 years. Health and disease are understood in terms of the balance and imbalance of humors (body fluids), and herbs were classified in terms of their effects on the humors. See also medicine, humoral.
medicine, herbal,
n treatment of disease with herbs and medicinal plants; the major form of medicine used by 7 out of 10 people worldwide.
medicine, Hispano-Arabic,
n.pr the medicine of the medieval Spanish, Moors, and Arabs. It was heavily informed by the Hellenistic medical thought of Galen and the diet therapies of India; also included the innovations of public hygiene and surgery.
medicine, humanistic,
n an interdisciplinary approach to the art and science of medicine that takes into account the view of the practitioner; the experiences of the patient, family, and the particular situations; and the societal role of healing and health care.
medicine, humoral,
n medicine deriving from the Hellenistic concept of the four bodily humors that aims to restore health by maintaining their proper balance. See also medicine, Galenic.
medicine, integral,
n holistic system of medicine based on the integral philosophy of Ken Wilber; attempts to integrate the physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, environmental, cultural, and social aspects of each patient.
medicine, integrated,
n holistic system of medicine that uses conventional and alternative therapies to treat each patient biographically by situating their health concerns in the con-text of their lives and environments.
medicine, integrative,
n holistic system of medicine that combines the best treatments and approaches from various disciplines—including traditional medicine, natural healing, phytotherapy, and Eastern modalities—so that treatments complement one another resulting in safer and effective care.
Enlarge picture
Medicine, integrative.
medicine, Japanese herbal,
n.pr See kampo.
medicine, magnetic,
n a seventeenth-century theory that asserted that good health could be restored by magnetically transferring the patient's illness to animals and plants.
medicine, mechanistic,
n an approach to healing that views disease as a disruption of the complex chemical and physical processes that make up a living organism. Removal of these disruptions leads to elimination or suppression of the disease.
medicine, mind-body,
n therapeutic practices that recognize the ways in which emotional, psychosocial, and spiritual factors interact with the body to influence health. Emphasizes techniques for developing self-awareness and self-care.
medicine, mindfulness,
n medical model that integrates mindfulness meditation practices to speed healing and recovery, cultivate relaxation, and increase acceptance.
Medicine, Native American (NAM),
n.pr a system encompassing the botanical, ritual, and spiritual knowledge, beliefs, and practices of all North American indigenous peoples.
medicine, Native American herbal,
n a therapeutic approach to healing in the Native American tradition that relies on herbal remedies.
medicine, natural,
n therapy for curing illness via organic means—such as diet, exercise, nutrition, herbs, light, and heat—to boost the patient's self-regulating systems.
medicine, naturopathic (naˈ·ch·paˑ·thik meˑ·d·sin),
n philosophy of treatment that encompasses the following seven ideas: nature's healing power; physicians should do no harm; physicians should seek to find the cause of illness; physicians treat the whole person when the cause is discovered; they prescribe preventive medicine; promote the patient's overall wellness, and, when warranted, teach the patient. In the US, naturopathic physicians (NDs) must have completed a four-year course of graduate study at an accredited institution.
medicine, oriental,
n a general term that typically refers to Chinese traditional medicine or to one of its components, such as acupuncture or herbal medicine.
medicine, orthomolecular (ōrˈ·thō·m·lekˑ·y·ler meˑ·di·sin),
n systematic approach to medicine using micronutrients and macronutrients, enzymes, amino acids, and friendly bacteria in optimal amounts to prevent and treat illness.
medicine, osteopathic,
n See osteopathy.
medicine, physical,
n the analysis and treatment of neuromuscular and musculoskeletal conditions which may interfere with mobility and function. Also called
physical therapy.
medicine, preventive,
n health care that aims at preventing disease in individuals and populations.
medicine, synthesis (sinˑ·th·sis meˑ·d·sin),
n philosophy used in diagnostic analysis and therapeutic approach. Specifically, a patient is not seen as an aggregate or compilation of parts functioning together but rather as a unit that comprises body and mind.
medicine, traditional,
medicine, traditional Chinese (TCM),
n an ancient system of medicine developed in China, based on the concept of qi, or vital energy, that flows throughout the body. Other components include herbal medicines, restorative physical exercises, meditation, acupuncture, acupressure, and remedial massage. See also qi.
medicine, transpersonal,
n the science and art of fostering well-being through sources beyond the patient's logical and conscious self.
medicine, ultramolecular,
n an alternate name sometimes used for homeopathy, referring to the extreme dilutions used in preparing homeopathic remedies.
medicine, vibrational (vī·brāˑ·sh·nl meˑ·di·sin),
n treatment of disease through the manipulation of a person's energy fields and applica-tion of electromagnetic frequencies.
medicine, wilderness,
n the treatment of injuries and trauma in locations, such as in national forests or parks, where traditional medical care may be inaccessible. Training in wilderness medicine includes the treatment of environmental injuries, response to plant and animal poisons, and basic backwoods transport methods.
medicines, stability of,
n the state of a remedy wherein its active attributes remain constant. The standard for the length of time over which a remedy is likely to retain its curative ability averages 5 years for source materials and tinctures. High potencies, when sheltered from light and heat, may remain stable indefinitely. See also potency, destruction of.
medicines, status of,
n the classification of relative importance of homeopathic remedies as polychrests, often used remedies, major remedies, and then minor remedies. These categories are based on the breadth of their function instead of their usefulness for a specific patient and are also determined by how much is known about a given remedy.

med·i·cine

(med'i-sin)
1. A drug.
2. Art of preventing or curing disease.
3. Study and treatment of general diseases or those affecting the internal parts of the body.

medicine (med´isin),

n 1. a remedy.
n 2. the art of healing.
medicine, oral,
n the discipline of dentistry that deals with the significance and relationship of oral and systemic disease.
medicine, practice of,
n a pursuit that includes the application and use of medicines and drugs for the purpose of curing or alleviating bodily diseases; surgery is usually limited to manual operations generally performed by means of surgical instruments or appliances.

medicine

1. any drug or remedy.
2. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.

food animal medicine
the veterinary medicine of the domesticated farm animals, including cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry and, with some flexibility, horses, that are used for and in the production of human food and of fiber used in human raiment. It includes the increasingly important segment of preventive and herd/flock medicine.
nuclear medicine
that branch of veterinary medicine devoted to the use of radionuclides in the diagnosis and treatment of animal diseases.
veterinary medicine
the science and art of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the diseases of animals, and the maintenance of normal health. This classic definition is now expanded in many areas to include the promotion of financially optimal production. It consists mostly of prevention of wastage caused by disease, but also includes inputs from nutrition, genetics, housing, and other management disciplines. See also veterinary medicine.

Patient discussion about medicine

Q. How effective are the traditional medicines?

A. I agree, chinese medicine is more about preventing- having the person totaly healthy at all times and not only curing the disease.

Q. Is there any Chinese medicine for cancer. Hi every one! I am a student of famous University. I heard about Chinese Medicine but I don’t have any idea. One of the incurable diseases is cancer. Is there any Chinese medicine for cancer?

A. hows it going DOC;I have seen and worked on patiants with lung cancer that had tried alternative meds(chines)and other natural remedies,and tried to cure them selves at home. when these patient come into the hospital they are almost in respiratory failure,because of the time they took with these unproven meds/IF alternative meds work for some people i am happy, but there needs to be more info on it for the general public, as you know all meds dont work for all people,the people that have been cured by chin meds should be monitered by both types of DR. during the treatment so that it can be proven.I will keep an open mind until this happens--peace--mrfoot56

Q. What are the most common Chinese Medicines that are most common in use?

A. i think that acupuncture is the most common of all the chines treatments in use. but i have no statistics to back it up. but as i understand - it's one of the most important tools of the Chinese medicine.

More discussions about medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
This school loan forgiveness program will help support veterinarians who want to pursue a career in food animal medicine that might otherwise not be able to afford to work in underserved areas," explains Dr.
Each recipient of the Food Animal Veterinarian Recruitment and Retention Pilot Program has made a commitment to working in food animal medicine for four years in an area that is experiencing a shortage of veterinary care.
It was encouraging to see so many veterinarians interested in food animal medicine, but more has to be done.

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