fomites


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fomes

 [fo´mēz] (pl. fo´mites) (L.)
an inanimate object or material on which disease-producing agents may be conveyed.

fom·i·tes

(fō'mi-tēz),
Plural of fomes.

fomite

Any inanimate or nonpathogenic substance or material (e.g., sheets, surfaces of furniture, papers and so forth), exclusive of food, which may act as a vector for a pathogen.

fomites

Anything that has been in contact with a person suffering from an infectious disease, and which may transmit the infection to others. Fomites include sheets, towels, dressings, clothes, face flannels, crockery and cutlery, books and papers.

fomites

see fomes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recent studies have highlighted the role of fomites in transmission of various bacteria, which can survive for days on common surfaces.
Stories of infection of naive populations through fomites in clothing, cloth or blankets abound in New World history, beginning from the time of the Spanish conquest of Central and South America and going through at least until the twentieth century.
Patients treated with TNF inhibitors may acquire coccidiomycosis infection through fomite dust exposure.
Data on survival of MRSA on fomites directly associated with clinical laboratory practice was not found in a comprehensive literature search.
Prevalence of rotavirus on high-risk fomites in daycare facilities.
A loop road will be used by fomites coming from delhi, entering Noida without increasing the burden on the highway.
Transmission occurs by direct contact and sometimes spreads through fomites.
14) Falcons are commonly infected directly with APMV-1 through feeding on infected domesticated pigeons (Columba livid), coturnix quail (Coturnix japonica), and, more rarely, poultry, or indirectly by being housed in close proximity to infected birds or by fomites.
Assessment of the risk of Ebola virus transmission from bodily fluids and fomites.
Person-to-person transmission of enteric pathogens through direct contact and via fomites has been noted in a number of instances (12).
The causative organism is transmitted by direct contact with secretions from lesions or on fomites.