fomentation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

fomentation

 [fo″men-ta´shun]
treatment by warm, moist applications; also, the substance thus applied.

fo·men·ta·tion

(fō'men-tā'shŭn),
1. A warm application.
See also: poultice, stupe.
2. Application of warmth and moisture in the treatment of disease.
[L. fomento, pp. -atus, to foment, fr. fomentum, a poultice, fr. foveo, to keep warm]

fomentation

/fo·men·ta·tion/ (fo″men-ta´shun) treatment by warm moist applications; also, the substance thus applied.

fomentation

(fō′mən-tā′shən, -mĕn-)
n.
1. The act of fomenting; incitement.
2.
a. A substance or material used as a warm, moist medicinal compress; a poultice.
b. The therapeutic application of warmth and moisture, as to relieve pain.

fomentation

[fō′mentā′shən]
Etymology: L, fomentare, to apply a poultice
1 a topical treatment for pain or inflammation that uses a warm, moist application.
2 a substance or poultice that is used as a warm, moist application.

hot compress

Naturopathy
A locally applied cloth imbibed with hot water, which is analgesic, antispasmodic, sedative and vasodilatory.

fomentation

A warm, moist compress or poultice, or the application of warmth and moisture for medical purposes. Fomentation causes an increase in the blood supply to the underlying area and this can be helpful in treating inflammation.

fo·men·ta·tion

(fō'men-tā'shŭn)
1. A warm application.
2. Application of warmth and moisture to treat disease.

fomentation

treatment by warm, moist applications; also, the substance thus applied. Hosing down with cold water is referred to as cold fomentation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whole boiled root is applied to cuts and sores, and soothing fomentation for rheumatic pains prepared with boiled leaves (Oliver, 1986; Iwu and Anyanwu 1982, 1982a).
And if all this was not enough, customers could experience hot and cold dripping sheets, carbolic acid fomentation and a vigorous rubbing with chilli paste.
However, much of this fomentation usually surrounds Forest Service activities in national forests.
Fomentations of tepid water or other substances were applied to injured parts, especially in dislocations, frostbite, and bruises where the skin had not been broken.
of cases treated Calomel / Hydrargyrium submurias PM 137 Calomel - colocynth compound PM 79 Cathartic dose (unspecified) P 73 Magnesium sulphate P 73 Ipecac E 65 Antimony potassium tartrate E 62 Opium A 59 Jalap P 54 Antimonials (powders/pills) E 48 Vesicatoires / blisters S 38 Rhei / rhubarb P 35 Colocynth / bitter cucumber P 33 Cataplasm / poultice S 33 Purgatives (unspecified) P 31 Emplastrum cantharidis S 31 Dover's powders (Ipecac and Opium) EA 25 Ricinus / castor oil P 23 Camphor S 22 Hydrargyrium (unspecified mercurial) M 21 Fomentations / baths S 20 Key to Drug Type A = analgesic or pain-killer; E = emetic; P = purgative or laxative; M = mercury; S = skin or topical
17) Using a sterilizer, clothes wringer, and large holding forceps, nurses recycled old blankets cut into strips to make hot fomentations that were covered and secured by rubber sheeting and dry blankets.
This included dehydration due to diarrhoea and vomiting, and burns resulting from hot fomentations and steaming.
In those days, hot fomentations and bread poultices were applied as required and bee and wasp stings received the "blue-bag" treatment.