fodder

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fodder

feed for herbivorous animals, usually used to describe dried leafy material such as hay. See also forage.

fodder beet
a root crop grown solely as a source of feed for cattle, possibly sheep. Lactic acidosis, oxalate andnitrite poisoning are all possible with fodder beet feeding. See also betavulgaris, carbohydrate engorgement.
fodder crop
crops being grown for hay, e.g. oats, barley, wheat. Can also be used for grazing and may cause hypomagnesemia or nitrite poisoning. The group of diseases is known as cereal crop poisoning.
fodder poisoning
an all-embracing term used with reference to sickness occurring in animals being fed hay which is often moldy or damaged in some way. See also mycotoxicosis.
fodder radish
see raphanussativus.
fodder sorghum
sorghumbicolor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Berseem is important winter fodder crop in Pakistan which is preoccupied with various minor and major pests viz.
0% FeSO4 thrice at 30, 37 and 44 days after sowing should be used along with recommended dose of fertilizers for sustainable production of this important fodder crop raised in Fe deficient alkaline soils.
The conversion factors used for estimating fodder crop yields were obtained by using the weighted average method, taking into consideration, yield and area under different fodder crops (Hand Book of Agriculture, 2005), with an average yield of 40.
Since, fodder crop had limited market and higher amount of production would lead to significantly decline in fodder prices.
Fodder crop productivity at the individual farm level could be improved by extension services and R&D activities which are more focused on these crops.
This issue may be resolved by conserving surplus fodder in the form of silage or hay when fodder crops are at maximum production.
Although 16-19 (Percent) of the total cropped area in Pakistan comes under different fodder crops.
The agricultural economy of developing countries is greatly aided by utilizing fodder crops as least cost source of nutrients for livestock.
Wood Farm was the venue for an open day staged by Keenan Rumans and their consultant nutritionist David Jacklin and NK Seeds' Nigel Padbury who urged north of England livestock producers to consider growing maize as a cost-effective fodder crop.
To keep plants safe from wrath of high temperatures, farmers should develop a fence of 'Jantar', a fodder crop on the south western side.
It is a prolific biomass producer and farmers can use this as fodder crop if they are not intended to get grain from it.