focus group


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focus group

A group of people from a particular population who are asked by a trained facilitator their opinions and beliefs about a particular subject which is of interest to the population from which they were selected. The NHS uses focus groups to assess staff opinion on how a Trust is progressing towards achieving a particular goal (e.g., implementing the Improving Working Lives initiative).

fo·cus group

(fō'kŭs grūp)
Small group of people gathered together for purpose of identifying and discussing points of view about topic; discussion led by facilitator from outside the group.

fo·cus group

(fō'kŭs grūp)
Small group of people gathered together to identify and discuss points of view; discussion led by outside facilitator.
References in periodicals archive ?
The benefits of using online focus group methodology far outweigh the challenges described in this pilot study.
Focus group research: What is it and how can it be used?
These questions are the core of focus group interview.
A similar survey was administered after the students conducted the focus groups.
An extension of the interviews occurs if an ad hoc group of people is created for an informal focus group to solicit information on a market and to gain a greater understanding of the dynamics of buyer and seller behavior.
pictured) who recently put together a focus group to explore how he could take his advertising to the next level.
Major Finding: Among 16 focus groups made up of 103 residents and staff, 18% of the groups and 38% of participants reported witnessing sexually aggressive behavior in a nursing home setting.
As demonstrated by these comments, students took advantage of the focus group to verbalize their excitement about the upcoming project and possibilities while also venting their fears and concerns.
The focus group interview is a more dynamic and social process than an individual interview, as it can facilitate and stimulate discussion, leading to greater spontaneity of responses.
All steps possible should be taken to ensure that the survey sample or the focus group participants reflect the demographic diversity of a jurisdiction; to the greatest extent possible, no group should be left out.
Some researchers choose to record and transcribe focus group data to better assess identified themes, whereas others document themes during the group (Stewart & Shamdasani, 1990).