focal necrosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

fo·cal ne·cro·sis

occurrence of numerous, relatively small or tiny, fairly well-circumscribed, usually spheroidal portions of tissue that manifest coagulative, caseous, or gummatous necrosis and are characteristically associated with agents that are hematogenously disseminated; frequently observed only in histologic sections, but the foci may be as large as 1-3 mm and macroscopically visible; arbitrarily, foci larger than that are usually not termed focal necrosis.

fo·cal ne·cro·sis

(fō'kăl nĕ-krō'sis)
Occurrence of numerous small, well-circumscribed zones of tissue that manifest coagulative, caseous, or gummatous necrosis.

focal necrosis

Necrosis in small scattered areas, often seen in infection.
See also: necrosis
References in periodicals archive ?
Other significant features identified were acute hepatitis, swelling of hepatocytes and focal necrosis (Figures 3, 4 and 5; Table 3) in both high and low dose groups which were of mild to moderate type.
96%), 34 patients had spotty and focal necrosis (73.
Although focal necrosis, fibrin deposits, prominent leukocyte infiltration, apoptotic figures and marked thickening of the intima as well as focal matrix accumulation/fibrosis along the arterial wall in CAL mice, Antroq administration was shown to greatly ameliorate the histopathological alterations.
lepturus venom caused focal necrosis in skin and pathologic alterations in liver, spleen, and kidney.
Pathologic examination of the biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation with focal necrosis, and although a Fite stain of the biopsy was obtained with good controls, it was initially negative.
Pathologic examination of the surgical specimen revealed a 20 x 13 x 9-cm primarily solid heterogeneous mass, containing tan-yellow and white areas with focal necrosis, hemorrhage and myxoid change.
The results of our study indicate that toxic doses of APAP may prone rats more susceptible to periportal and focal necrosis.
Focal necrosis, mild pleomorphism, and plasma cells can be seen.
8) Histologically, they appear more aggressive, with nuclear pleomorphism, cytologic atypia, increased mitotic activity, focal necrosis, and lymphatic/vascular invasion.
While many patients with severe class III may exhibit focal necrosis (karyorrhexis) or extracapillary proliferation (crescents), these findings are not required for staging a particular biopsy as class III or class IV.
0 mg/L) of malathion showed several changes such as focal necrosis (FN), loosening of hepatic tissue (LHT), pycknosis (P), haemorrhage (H), and degeneration of muscle (DM) (Fig.