focal infection


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Related to focal infection: primary infection, mixed infection, Secondary infection

fo·cal in·fec·tion

an old term that distinguishes local infections (focal) from generalized infections (sepsis).

focal infection

n.
A bacterial infection localized in a specific part of the body, such as the tonsils, that may spread to another part of the body.

fo·cal in·fec·tion

(fō'kăl in-fek'shŭn)
Local infection that can serve as a source of disseminated or metastatic infection.

fo·cal in·fec·tion

(fō'kăl in-fek'shŭn)
Local infection that can serve as a source of disseminated or metastatic infection.

focal infection,

n the site or origin of an infectious process. Endodontically treated teeth have frequently been accused of being the source of septicemias, often without justification. See also infection, focal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of rapid Influenza testing on patient management parameters in children with influenza like illness (II_I) without any signs of focal infection presenting to the pediatric emergency department during the influenza season.
Unsuspected or 'occult' bacteremia in children 3 to 36 months of age has been reported in up to 4% of febrile infants and toddlers without evidence of toxicity or focal infection.
However, the Germans made a big study of focal infections.
These are not visible in a clinical setting (although can be seen with an electron microscope; see OT September 17 2010) but can lead to the development of acute-onset focal infections that are visible clinically.
In all, 21% of the bacteremia cases subsequently developed focal infections, including septic arthritis, pneumonia, peritonitis, and cutaneous abscess (Chen et al.
Focal infections with L monocytogenes are uncommon but have been reported in immunocompromised patients.
focal infections, limited to a particular body site, e.
Neuprex and other BPI products are also under consideration for use in the treatment of gram-negative sepsis, acute and chronic focal infections and as adjunct therapy with conventional antibiotics.