foam cells


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foam cells

cells with abundant, pale-staining, finely vacuolated cytoplasm, usually histiocytes that have ingested or accumulated material that dissolves during tissue preparation, especially lipids.
See also: lipophage.

foam cells

(fōm selz)
Cells with abundant, pale-staining, finely vacuolated cytoplasm, usually histiocytes that have ingested or accumulated material that dissolves during tissue preparation, especially lipids.
See also: lipophage
References in periodicals archive ?
Endothelial cell activation promotes foam cell formation by monocytes following transendothelial migration in an in vitro model.
We used U937-derived macrophages because these cells are frequently used to develop foam cells after treatment with modified low density protein (Martens et al.
1) Although masses of cholesterol, foam cells, and giant cells are often seen as secondary or degenerative findings in many bone lesions, the underlying or "primary" lesion can be radiologically or histologically identified in most cases.
Escherichia coli), can promote macrophage foam cell formation in vitro (8,39).
i60] shows the cell structure for foams when compared to 0% reinforcement; in all cases 0% shows regular foam cells.
The interpretation is that their expression might affect the migratory behavior of foam cells, as well as the adhesive interaction between these cells and the extracellular matrix, possibly explaining the retention of foam cells in atherosclerotic plaques.
The surface geometry uses over 500 individual foam cells that conform to the shape of the resident's body and distribute pressure evenly.
This digestive failure may explain the mechanism that transforms otherwise desirable macrophages into undesirable foam cells, which play a key role in the build-up of arterial deposits.
Normally, mice on low-fat diets do not accumulate the fat-filled foam cells along vessel walls that lead to clogged arteries.
Remarkably, the production of atherosclerotic lesions and foam cells (indicators of advanced atherosclerosis) was also reduced by almost half compared to controls.
Possible sources for weight loss are (1) air's buoyant force applied by the increasing volume of the foam, (2) rupture of foam cells (bubbles) with collapse of the cell or replacement of the vapors by new vapors, and (3) evaporation/escape of MF, water, or carbon dioxide along the upper surface of the foam.