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flux

 [fluks]
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area.
magnetic flux (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks),
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amounts from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea.
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
4. An ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
5. The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time. Synonym(s): flux density (1)
6. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
7. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
8. The strength of a field of force (for example, magnetic) orthogonal to a unit area.
9. The rate of chemical or physical transformation or translocation of a substance per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

(fluks)
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity per unit area.

magnetic flux  (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks)
n.
Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.

flux

[fluks]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
1 an excessive flow or discharge.
2 a substance that maintains the cleanliness of metals to be united and facilitates the easy flow and attachment of solder.

flux

An MRI-centric term for the invisible lines of force that extend around a magnetic material, which are the most dense at the two poles of the magnet.

flux

(flŭks)
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amount from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it during casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations. Also, an ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
4. (J) The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time.
5. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
6. diagnostic radiology Photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

the rate of flow of matter or energy

flux,

n 1. an excessive discharge or flow.
2. undulation or changing course of a condition.

flux

(flŭks)
1. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
2. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux,

n a substance or mixture used to promote fusion, especially the fusion of metals or minerals. Used principally in dentistry as an inclusion in ceramic materials and in soldering and casting metals.
flux, casting,
n a flux that increases fluidity of the metal and helps to prevent oxidation.
flux, ceramic,
n a flux used in the manufacture of porcelain and silicate powders.
flux, reducing,
n a flux that contains powdered charcoal to remove oxides.
flux, soldering,
n a ceramic material such as borax, boric acid, or a combination, in paste, liquid, or granular form; used to keep metallic parts clean while they are being heated during a soldering procedure. It is a solvent for metallic oxides and will flow over the parts to be soldered at temperatures well below the fusion temperature of solder, but it becomes separated from the solid metal by the molten solder.

flux

1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. matter discharged.

bloody flux
dysentery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because J-STD-004B requires quantitative testing, MANY FLUXES DESIGNATED LO WILL NOW BE CONSIDERED LI UNDER THE NEW SYSTEM.
The logic behind the blend is straightforward and with obvious advantages: Fluxes devised for Pb-free soldering would better facilitate wetting to Pb-free surfaces than those designed for SnPb alone, and these fluxes are sufficiently thermally robust to perform in the top quartile of the SnPb peak temperature range typically associated with mixed metals assembly.
Insulative materials are designed into the fluxes and tested for electrical reliability.
As water is nonflammable, water-based fluxes no longer have to be stored in special cabinets on the production floor.
This article will discuss present foundry practices in the use of powder and granular fluxes in crucible furnaces, transfer ladles and rever-beratory furnaces.
Recommendations: The problem described sounds like a flux attack, Most fluxes used in molten aluminum production contain alkaline salts that, under certain conditions, can attack crucible walls.
Fluxes can be highly reactive chemicals that, if left on the assemblies, can lead to corrosion, electrical degradation, and decreased reliability.
There are so many different fluxes with different activators, rosin or resin-based, alcohol-based solvents or VOC-free, that one should contact the flux supplier and discuss the demands for the use of the board (circuit/equipment).
Industrial Gypsum offers Metallpur, its line of registered fluxes for zinc that provide for optimum separation without the noxious fuming and smoking usually associated with other zinc fluxes.
The additional influx of solder types, fluxes and board finishes can make for a confusing equation, making it more difficult for hand-soldering operators to maintain process efficiency.