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flux

 [fluks]
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area.
magnetic flux (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks),
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amounts from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea.
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
4. An ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
5. The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time. Synonym(s): flux density (1)
6. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
7. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
8. The strength of a field of force (for example, magnetic) orthogonal to a unit area.
9. The rate of chemical or physical transformation or translocation of a substance per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

(fluks)
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity per unit area.

magnetic flux  (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks)
n.
Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.

flux

[fluks]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
1 an excessive flow or discharge.
2 a substance that maintains the cleanliness of metals to be united and facilitates the easy flow and attachment of solder.

flux

An MRI-centric term for the invisible lines of force that extend around a magnetic material, which are the most dense at the two poles of the magnet.

flux

(flŭks)
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amount from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it during casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations. Also, an ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
4. (J) The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time.
5. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
6. diagnostic radiology Photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

the rate of flow of matter or energy

flux,

n 1. an excessive discharge or flow.
2. undulation or changing course of a condition.

flux

(flŭks)
1. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
2. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux,

n a substance or mixture used to promote fusion, especially the fusion of metals or minerals. Used principally in dentistry as an inclusion in ceramic materials and in soldering and casting metals.
flux, casting,
n a flux that increases fluidity of the metal and helps to prevent oxidation.
flux, ceramic,
n a flux used in the manufacture of porcelain and silicate powders.
flux, reducing,
n a flux that contains powdered charcoal to remove oxides.
flux, soldering,
n a ceramic material such as borax, boric acid, or a combination, in paste, liquid, or granular form; used to keep metallic parts clean while they are being heated during a soldering procedure. It is a solvent for metallic oxides and will flow over the parts to be soldered at temperatures well below the fusion temperature of solder, but it becomes separated from the solid metal by the molten solder.

flux

1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. matter discharged.

bloody flux
dysentery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notes and Correspondence Stability-Dependent Exchange Coefficient for Air-Sea Fluxes, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 22: 1080-1094.
The yield strength, tensile strength and fracture energy of the all-weld metal, laid by using the parent fluxes, are slightly higher than those of the all-weld metal, laid by using the developed flux.
Chai & Edgar (1981) in their study mentioned that a major advancement in systemizing the study of weld fluxes begun by Christensen & Chipman (1953).
In addition to mentioned electrodes a titanium electrode may be used in melting of oxygen-free fluxes as a non-consumable one.
Hypothetically, fluxes that tend to induce the solder nucleation are expected to result in a greater number of grains, smaller dendrites and, consequently, smoother solder surface.
At this high flow speed, fluxes do not change substantially with increasing pitching frequency,, perhaps because the tangential velocity of the pitching model is such a small fraction of the mainstream velocity.
A boxplot of voiding data for the non-oxidized SnPb substrates for both fluxes is shown in FIGURE 6.
Most metal cleaning fluxes used in molten aluminum production contain alkaline salts, which can be aggressive and under certain conditions can attack crucible walls.