flux


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to flux: Electric flux, magnetic flux

flux

 [fluks]
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity (or magnetic field) per unit area.
magnetic flux (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks),
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amounts from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea.
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
4. An ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
5. The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time. Synonym(s): flux density (1)
6. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
7. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
8. The strength of a field of force (for example, magnetic) orthogonal to a unit area.
9. The rate of chemical or physical transformation or translocation of a substance per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

(fluks)
1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. the rate of the flow of some quantity per unit area.

magnetic flux  (Φ) a quantitative measure of a magnetic field.

flux

(flŭks)
n.
Medicine The discharge of large quantities of fluid material from the body, especially the discharge of watery feces from the intestines.

flux

[fluks]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
1 an excessive flow or discharge.
2 a substance that maintains the cleanliness of metals to be united and facilitates the easy flow and attachment of solder.

flux

An MRI-centric term for the invisible lines of force that extend around a magnetic material, which are the most dense at the two poles of the magnet.

flux

(flŭks)
1. The discharge of a fluid material in large amount from a cavity or surface of the body.
See also: diarrhea
2. Material discharged from the bowels.
3. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it during casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations. Also, an ingredient in dental porcelain that by its lower melting temperature helps to bond the silica particles.
4. (J) The moles of a substance crossing through a unit area of a boundary layer or membrane per unit of time.
5. Bidirectional movement of a substance at a membrane or surface.
6. diagnostic radiology Photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux

the rate of flow of matter or energy

flux,

n 1. an excessive discharge or flow.
2. undulation or changing course of a condition.

flux

(flŭks)
1. A material used to remove oxides from the surface of molten metal and to protect it when casting; serves a similar purpose in soldering operations.
2. In diagnostic radiology, photon fluence per unit time.
[L. fluxus, a flow]

flux,

n a substance or mixture used to promote fusion, especially the fusion of metals or minerals. Used principally in dentistry as an inclusion in ceramic materials and in soldering and casting metals.
flux, casting,
n a flux that increases fluidity of the metal and helps to prevent oxidation.
flux, ceramic,
n a flux used in the manufacture of porcelain and silicate powders.
flux, reducing,
n a flux that contains powdered charcoal to remove oxides.
flux, soldering,
n a ceramic material such as borax, boric acid, or a combination, in paste, liquid, or granular form; used to keep metallic parts clean while they are being heated during a soldering procedure. It is a solvent for metallic oxides and will flow over the parts to be soldered at temperatures well below the fusion temperature of solder, but it becomes separated from the solid metal by the molten solder.

flux

1. an excessive flow or discharge.
2. matter discharged.

bloody flux
dysentery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cresa's services were above and beyond what we expected,” stated Matt Brueggeman, Co-Founder and Director of Communication of Flux Mopeds, “without Cresa's assistance, it is unlikely we would have found such a fantastic location at such favorable terms.
Depending on the type of assembly and flux, it may be best to use one wave former.
In 1988 Spooner suggested axial flux permanent magnet slotless for application in automobile.
Utilizing developments in neutron guide technology, particularly curved "benders" to transport the beam far away from other equipment and experiments without significant loss of flux, thereby reducing gamma-ray and neutron backgrounds.
The factors influencing flux performance are as follows:
FLUX participants are already able to make use of the rapid border passage facilities at Amsterdam/Schiphol, John F Kennedy International Airport in New York, George Bush International Airport in Houston, Washington Dulles International Airport, Los Angeles International Airport, Miami International Airport and Hartsfield Jackson International Airport in Chicago.
3] combinations is chosen to control flux and torque within the limits of hysteresis bands.
Art director Faith Stafford says Flux magazine is what sold her on going to school at the UO.
It was proposed to perform melting of flux in a copper water-cooled mould with application of a non-consumable (non-melting) electrode.
Solder bumping onto a socket is performed by printing paste or pin-transfer flux onto the pin head, followed by solder ball placement and reflow.