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flutter

 [flut´er]
a rapid vibration or pulsation.
atrial flutter a cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (230–380 per minute), but regular. Two types, I and II, are distinguished according to rate; Type I is also more amenable to cardioversion. In Type I the atrial rate is usually 290 to 310 per minute but can range from 230 to 350. In Type II the atrial rate is usually 360 to 380 per minute but can range from 340 to 430.
diaphragmatic flutter peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause.
impure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter see mediastinal flutter.
pure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
ventricular flutter a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.

flut·ter

(flŭt'ĕr),
Agitation; tremulousness.
[A.S. floterian, to float about]

flutter

/flut·ter/ (flut´er) a rapid vibration or pulsation.
atrial flutter  cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (250 to 350 per minute), but regular.
diaphragmatic flutter  peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause.
impure flutter  atrial flutter in which the electrocardiogram shows alternating periods of atrial flutter and fibrillation or periods not clearly one or the other.
mediastinal flutter  abnormal motility of the mediastinum during respiration.
pure flutter  atrial f.
ventricular flutter  (VFI) a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.

flutter

(flŭt′ər)
n.
Abnormally rapid pulsation, especially of the atria or ventricles of the heart.

flutter

a rapid vibration or pulsation that may interfere with normal function.
A family of cardiac tachyarrhythmias characterised by rapid regular atrial (250-350/min) or ventricular (200/min) rhythms

flutter

Cardiology A family of cardiac tachyarrhythmias characterized by rapid regular atrial–250-350/min or ventricular–200/min rhythms. See Atrial flutter, Ventricular flutter. Cf Fibrillation.
Flutter types
Atrial flutter occurs at 200-350 beats/min (with a 2:1 block, so that the ventricle fires at ± 150 beats/min); AF results from a circus pathway, occurs in atrial dilatation, primary myocardial disease, or rheumatic heart disease and responds poorly to antiarrhythmics
Ventricular flutter is characterized by a continuous and regular depolarization rate of greater than 200 beats/min, and demonstrates high-amplitude zigzag pattern on the EKG, without clear definition of the QRS and T waves, a pattern that may revert spontaneously to a normal sinus rhythm or progress to ventricular fibrillation

flut·ter

(flŭt'ĕr)
Agitation; tremulousness.
[A.S. floterian, to float about]

flut·ter

(flŭt'ĕr)
Agitation; tremulousness.
[A.S.floterian, to float about]

flutter,

n a quick, irregular motion.

flutter

a rapid vibration or pulsation.

atrial flutter
cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (200-320 per minute), but regular.
diaphragmatic flutter
peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause. See also synchronous diaphragmatic flutter.
impure flutter
atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter
abnormal mobility of the mediastinum during respiration.
pure flutter
atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
flutter valve
in an intravenous infusion apparatus, a floating bead in the fluid chamber that allows air to enter the system but prevents fluid from escaping. Its movement is often viewed as an indicator of the speed of fluid infusion, but it is inaccurate.
ventricular flutter
a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.
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