flutter

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flutter

 [flut´er]
a rapid vibration or pulsation.
atrial flutter a cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (230–380 per minute), but regular. Two types, I and II, are distinguished according to rate; Type I is also more amenable to cardioversion. In Type I the atrial rate is usually 290 to 310 per minute but can range from 230 to 350. In Type II the atrial rate is usually 360 to 380 per minute but can range from 340 to 430.
diaphragmatic flutter peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause.
impure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter see mediastinal flutter.
pure flutter atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
ventricular flutter a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.

flut·ter

(flŭt'ĕr),
Agitation; tremulousness.
[A.S. floterian, to float about]

flutter

/flut·ter/ (flut´er) a rapid vibration or pulsation.
atrial flutter  cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (250 to 350 per minute), but regular.
diaphragmatic flutter  peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause.
impure flutter  atrial flutter in which the electrocardiogram shows alternating periods of atrial flutter and fibrillation or periods not clearly one or the other.
mediastinal flutter  abnormal motility of the mediastinum during respiration.
pure flutter  atrial f.
ventricular flutter  (VFI) a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.

flutter

(flŭt′ər)
n.
Abnormally rapid pulsation, especially of the atria or ventricles of the heart.

flutter

a rapid vibration or pulsation that may interfere with normal function.
A family of cardiac tachyarrhythmias characterised by rapid regular atrial (250-350/min) or ventricular (200/min) rhythms

flutter

Cardiology A family of cardiac tachyarrhythmias characterized by rapid regular atrial–250-350/min or ventricular–200/min rhythms. See Atrial flutter, Ventricular flutter. Cf Fibrillation.
Flutter types
Atrial flutter occurs at 200-350 beats/min (with a 2:1 block, so that the ventricle fires at ± 150 beats/min); AF results from a circus pathway, occurs in atrial dilatation, primary myocardial disease, or rheumatic heart disease and responds poorly to antiarrhythmics
Ventricular flutter is characterized by a continuous and regular depolarization rate of greater than 200 beats/min, and demonstrates high-amplitude zigzag pattern on the EKG, without clear definition of the QRS and T waves, a pattern that may revert spontaneously to a normal sinus rhythm or progress to ventricular fibrillation

flut·ter

(flŭt'ĕr)
Agitation; tremulousness.
[A.S. floterian, to float about]

flut·ter

(flŭt'ĕr)
Agitation; tremulousness.
[A.S.floterian, to float about]

flutter,

n a quick, irregular motion.

flutter

a rapid vibration or pulsation.

atrial flutter
cardiac arrhythmia in which the atrial contractions are rapid (200-320 per minute), but regular.
diaphragmatic flutter
peculiar wavelike fibrillations of the diaphragm of unknown cause. See also synchronous diaphragmatic flutter.
impure flutter
atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is irregular.
mediastinal flutter
abnormal mobility of the mediastinum during respiration.
pure flutter
atrial flutter in which the atrial rhythm is regular.
flutter valve
in an intravenous infusion apparatus, a floating bead in the fluid chamber that allows air to enter the system but prevents fluid from escaping. Its movement is often viewed as an indicator of the speed of fluid infusion, but it is inaccurate.
ventricular flutter
a possible transition stage between ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, the electrocardiogram showing rapid, uniform, and virtually regular oscillations, 250 or more per minute.
References in classic literature ?
he exclaimed; and then he insisted on the Wizard taking the box of flutters and the little girl accepting the box of rustles.
Here, then, I made my home; and although it is a lonely place I amuse myself making rustles and flutters, and so get along very nicely.
I think I will have a flutter if you don't mind," said Philip anxiously.
He had ante'd his life for a dozen years, and forty thousand was a small pot for such a stake--the price of a drink and a dance at the Tivoli, of a winter's flutter at Circle City, and a grubstake for the year to come.
Tuck it under you so that it won't flutter, and see what happens.
Out in the back-pasture, a quail could flutter up under his nose unharmed.
In the centre of this vast assemblage the lists seemed but a narrow strip of green marked out with banners and streamers, while a gleam of white with a flutter of pennons at either end showed where the marquees were pitched which served as the dressing-rooms of the combatants.
Again, to mark the nice distinction between two persons actuated by the same vice or folly is another; and, as this last talent is found in very few writers, so is the true discernment of it found in as few readers; though, I believe, the observation of this forms a very principal pleasure in those who are capable of the discovery; every person, for instance, can distinguish between Sir Epicure Mammon and Sir Fopling Flutter; but to note the difference between Sir Fopling Flutter and Sir Courtly Nice requires a more exquisite judgment: for want of which, vulgar spectators of plays very often do great injustice in the theatre; where I have sometimes known a poet in danger of being convicted as a thief, upon much worse evidence than the resemblance of hands hath been held to be in the law.
It would flutter and live till the last line of communication was broken, and after that who was to say how much longer it might continue to flutter and live?
AW, Gosforth, Newcastle Night Wings THE tortoiseshell in the room Fluttering around the light As though it's an electric moon Flashes of orange On fragile wings Around in circles the butterfly goes Before settling on the blue wall Taking off again towards the window Out into the shadows of night The tortoiseshell flutters away Leaving behind a feeling of awe.