fluorosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to fluorosis: Skeletal fluorosis

fluorosis

 [floo͡″ro´sis]
a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluorine or its compounds; see fluoride poisoning.
chronic endemic fluorosis that due to unusually high concentrations of fluoride, usually in the natural drinking water supply, typically causing dental fluorosis characterized by a mottled appearance of the teeth. Combined osteosclerosis and osteomalacia can also occur in occupational exposures to vapors and dust.
dental fluorosis hypoplasia of the dental enamel resulting from prolonged ingestion of drinking water containing high levels of fluoride, manifested by the condition called mottled enamel.
skeletal fluorosis skeletal changes due to long term ingestion of excessive fluoride; they may include hyperostosis, osteopetrosis, and osteoporosis.

fluor·o·sis

(flōr-ō'sis),
1. A condition caused by an excessive intake of fluorides (2 or more ppm in drinking water), characterized mainly by mottling, staining, or hypoplasia of the enamel of the teeth, although the skeletal bones are also affected.
2. Chronic poisoning of livestock with fluorides that blacken and soften developing teeth and reduce bones to a chalky brittleness; most often caused by ingestion of forage contaminants near large aluminum plants.

fluorosis

/flu·o·ro·sis/ (fldbobr-ro´sis)
1. a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluorine.
2. a condition in humans due to exposure to excessive amounts of fluorine or its compounds, resulting from accidental ingestion of certain insecticides and rodenticides, chronic inhalation of industrial dusts or gases, or prolonged ingestion of water containing large amounts of fluorides; characterized by skeletal changes such as osteofluorosis and by mottled enamel when exposure occurs during enamel formation.

chronic endemic fluorosis  fluorosis.
dental fluorosis  mottled enamel.

fluorosis

(flo͝o-rō′sĭs, flô-, flō-)
n.
An abnormal condition caused by excessive intake of fluorine, as from fluoridated drinking water, characterized chiefly by mottling of the teeth.

fluo·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.

fluorosis

[floo͡rō′sis]
Etymology: L, fluere + Gk, osis, condition
the condition that results from excessive prolonged ingestion of fluorine. Unusually high concentration of fluorine in the drinking water typically causes mottled discoloration and pitting of the enamel of the secondary and primary dentition in children whose teeth developed while maternal intake of fluorinated water was high. Severe chronic fluorine poisoning leads to osteosclerosis and other pathological bone and joint changes in adults. See also fluoridation, fluoride.
enlarge picture
Fluorosis
A chronic low-level intoxication that occurs where drinking water has fluoride concentrations above 2 ppm

fluorosis

Chronic fluoride poisoning Toxicology A chronic low-level intoxication that occurs where drinking water has fluoride > 2 ppm Clinical Weight loss, brittle bones, anemia, weakness, ill health, stiffness of joints, mottled enamel and chalky white discolored teeth with a normal resistance to caries; fluorosis is common, given flouride's availability in mouth rinses, toothpastes, misuse of fluoride treatments. See Fluoride, Fluoride poisoning, Fluoride treatment, Fluorine.

fluor·o·sis

(flōr-ō'sis)
A condition caused by an excessive intake of fluorides, characterized mainly by mottling, staining, or hypoplasia of the enamel of the teeth.

fluorosis

Poisoning with repeated large doses of the element fluorine. This may affect aluminium ore (bauxite) miners and workers involved in insecticide and phosphate fertilizer manufacture. The calcium in the bones is gradually replaced by fluorine and the bones become soft and crumbly. Abnormal bone protrusions occur and these may cause trouble, especially in the spine, where they may press on the spinal cord or nerve roots.

fluorosis (fl·rōˑ·sis),

n problem caused by excessive or protracted ingestion of fluorine. Causes a mottled appearance of the teeth and in extreme cases, pitting in the deciduous and secondary teeth. May be present in the offspring of females whose fluoride intake was high during pregnancy.
Enlarge picture
Fluorosis.

fluor·o·sis

(flōr-ō'sis)
Condition caused by an excessive fluoride intake (2 or more ppm in drinking water), characterized by mottling, staining, or hypoplasia of the tooth enamel.

fluorosis (flərō´sis),

n an enamel hypoplasia caused by the ingestion of excess fluoride during the time of enamel formation. General term for chronic fluoride poisoning.
fluorosis, chronic endemic dental (mottled enamel),
n an enamel defect caused by excessive ingestion of fluoride, possibly in the water supply (usually 2 to 8 ppm) during the period of tooth calcification. Affected teeth appear chalky white on eruption and later turn brown.
Enlarge picture
Fluorosis.
fluorosis, dental,
n an abnormal condition resulting from the ingestion of too much fluoride, causing a white or brown mottled appearance to the enamel of developing teeth.
fluorosis, index of dental,
n a classification system for determining the presence and severity of chronic fluoride poisoning in which the enamel on individual teeth is rated against a 0 to 4 scale with 0 representing normal enamel and 4 severely damaged enamel. This index may be used by communities to adjust the levels of fluoride in their water systems.

fluorosis

a condition due to ingestion of excessive amounts of fluorine or its compounds. Fluorine poisoning usually takes a chronic form in animals which are exposed to small amounts in their drinking water or food over long periods. Clinical signs include excessive wear and mottling of developing teeth, lameness due to osteoporosis and unthriftiness. Acute fluorosis caused by factory effluent is characterized by gastroenteritis, tetany and death.
Enlarge picture
Dental fluorosis. By permission from Blowey RW, Weaver AD, Diseases and Disorders of Cattle, Mosby, 1997

Patient discussion about fluorosis

Q. How do you differentiate between fluorosis and caries? Both appear as white spots on the teeth, so clinically how do you differentiate between them? I know it has something to do with their appearance while wet and dry, but I am not sure what? please help me I can't find this in any book.

A. Only mild fluorosis is seen as white stop lesion on the tooth. It usually comes with brown spots. Look for them. Another method is trying to stick a dental explorer into it (not the Microsoft one- it’ll only be a portal for viruses..) and because caries is demineralized area it will feel kind of sticky. But I wouldn’t do that…it can harm the teeth. Another way is by an x ray. Fluorosis- you will see it as a whiter spot. Caries- a more translucent spot.

More discussions about fluorosis
References in periodicals archive ?
The relationships between low levels of urine fluoride on children's intelligence, dental fluorosis in endemic fluorosis area in Hulunbuir, Inner Mongolia, China.
Some villages where diseases such as blue baby syndrome, rickets, dental fluorosis, gastroenteritis, skin ailments and neurological disorders occur commonly include Najafgarh, Kanjhawla, Alipur, Mehrauli, Dhansa, Roata, Auchandi, Qutabgarh, Jonti, Tikkrikalan, Sanoth and Rithala.
3] Sangam, 2003, "Combating fluorosis with household filters", Newsletters of UN inter agency-working group on water and environmental sanitation in India (UNICEF), 1-2.
Aim of the present study is to present the clinical findings of dental fluorosis in the isolated population of Brava, the smallest island among the Cape Verde Islands.
I opined that all his patients are of endemic skeletal fluorosis and calcium deficiency interaction syndromes and not of calcium deficiency rickets.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 30percent of children have enamel fluorosis, a condition that ranges from barely noticeable white flecks to substantial corrosion of the enamel on teeth.
A report by the US National Academy of Sciences found that the federal 'safe limit for fluoride in American tap water did not protect children from dental fluorosis or increased bone fractures'.
Enamel fluorosis occurred in 23% of adults in the 1999-2002 survey, though most cases were mild, with white spots on the teeth.
However, he didn't suffer long-term harm apart from slight fluorosis.
In fact, too much fluoride causes mottling of teeth ( ie dental fluorosis.
The group cited studies that linked fluoride to cancer in lab rats, weakening of bone density in older Americans and a growing number of citizens suffering from fluorosis, a condition that causes yellowing of the teeth after overexposure to fluoride, said William Hirzy, a senior scientist with the EPA's risk assessment division since 1981.