fluoroscope


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Related to fluoroscope: fluoroscopy, Flouroscope

fluoroscope

 [floor´o-skōp″]
an instrument for visual observation of the body by means of x-ray. The patient is put into position so that the part to be viewed is placed between an x-ray tube and a fluorescent screen. X-rays from the tube pass through the body and project the bones and organs as images on the screen. Examination by this method is called fluoroscopy.

The advantage of the fluoroscope is that the action of joints, organs, and entire systems of the body can be observed directly. The use of radiopaque media and radiolucent agents aids in this process.
Fluoroscope and associated parts. From Bushong, 2001.

fluor·o·scope

(flōr'ō-skōp),
1. An obsolete apparatus for rendering visible to the dark-adapted eye the patterns of x-rays that have passed through a body under examination, by interposing a glass plate coated with fluorescent materials, such as calcium tungstate; currently, image intensification and video display are used.
2. To examine a patient using a fluoroscope, obsolete or modern.
[fluorescence + G. skopeō, to examine]

fluoroscope

/flu·o·ro·scope/ (floor´o-skōp) an instrument for visual observation of the form and motion of the deep structures of the body by means of x-ray shadows projected on a fluorescent screen.

fluoroscope

(flo͝or′ə-skōp′, flôr′-)
n.
A device equipped with a fluorescent screen on which the internal structures of an optically opaque object, such as the human body, may be continuously viewed as shadowy images formed by the differential transmission of x-rays through the object. Also called roentgenoscope.
tr.v. fluoro·scoped, fluoro·scoping, fluoro·scopes
To examine the interior of (an object) with a fluoroscope.

fluor′o·scop′ic (-skŏp′ĭk) adj.
fluor′o·scop′i·cal·ly adv.

fluoroscope

[floo͡r′əskōp′]
Etymology: L, fluere + Gk, skopein, to look
a device used to project a radiographic image on a fluorescent screen for visual examination. fluoroscopic, adj.

fluor·o·scope

(flōr'ō-skōp)
An apparatus for rendering visible the patterns of x-rays that have passed through a body under examination, by interposing a glass plate coated with fluorescent materials, such as calcium tungstate; to examine a patient by fluoroscopy.
[fluorescence + G. skopeō, to examine]

fluoroscope

An X-ray viewing fluorescent screen allowing continuous viewing of internal structure of the body in conditions of low illumination. Fluoroscopy has been largely replaced by IMAGE INTENSIFIER methods.

Fluoroscope

A device used in some radiology procedures that provides immediate images and motion on a screen much like those seen at airport baggage security stations.

fluor·o·scope

(flōr'ō-skōp)
An apparatus for rendering visible the patterns of x-rays that have passed through a body under examination, by interposing a glass plate coated with fluorescent materials to examine a patient by fluoroscopy.
[fluorescence + G. skopeō, to examine]

fluoroscope (flôr´əscōp),

n a device consisting of a fluorescent screen mounted in a metal frame covered with lead glass. In the presence of a roentgen ray, the screen glows in direct proportion to the intensity of the remnant x-radiation, producing visual impressions of the densities traversed.

fluoroscope

an instrument for visual observation of the form and motion of the deep structures of the body by means of x-ray. The patient is put into position so that the part to be viewed is placed between an x-ray tube and a fluorescent screen. The x-rays from the tube pass through the body and project the bones and organs as shadowy images on the screen. Examination by this method is called fluoroscopy, but the image is viewed on a separate television monitor and not on the fluorescent screen. See also image intensification.
The advantage of the fluoroscope is that the action of joints, organs and entire systems of the body can be observed directly. The use of radiopaque media aids in this process. See also barium study.
References in periodicals archive ?
My personal search for information about fluoroscopes led me to unexpected places.
As adjunct to the patient's records, the clinic used fluoroscope as a dynamic medium to visually confirm an appropriate fit from a coronal view [3].
By watching the fluoroscope screen, the radiologist can see the outline of your blood vessels and identify any blockages or other irregularities.
We used the highly standardized x-ray method in all six of our clinical centers; the subject's knee was positioned with a fluoroscope for each exam, providing a very reproducible picture on each exam over the 30-month duration of the study.
And he applied for a patent on the first fluorescent electric lamp, leaving the fluoroscope he invented in the public domain to further the interest of medicine.
I volunteered to fluoroscope the ankle to see if a fracture could be detected.
low-light intensified and near or far infrared images; Essock, McCarley, Sinai, & Krebs, 1996; O'Kane, 1995; Uttal, Baruch, & Allen, 1994); and images from ultrasound, fluoroscope, or other medical devices of various types (Schmidt, Hier, Benyamin, & DeForest, 1998; Wolfe, 1994b).
The injected material is then monitored with a device called a fluoroscope as it travels through the biliary ducts, and the surgeon obtains an image similar to a real-time X-ray.
The company uses a real-time X-ray fluoroscope to confirm quality, and all wheels are pressure-tested for leaks.
As the doctor guides the catheter to the coronary arteries, the procedure is monitored by a special X-ray camera called a fluoroscope.
One can produce an adequate study with an x-ray machine or fluoroscope if one knows how to position a patient correctly and identify anatomical reference points using one's hands as a probe.
One way doctors take an "angio" is to pass a thin, flexible tube (catheter) into the heart, via an artery or vein, under the observation of a fluoroscope.