fluoroquinolone


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fluoroquinolone

 [floor″o-kwin´o-lōn]
any of a subgroup of quinolones that have a broader spectrum of activity than quinolones such as nalidixic acid.

fluor·o·quin·o·lone

(flūr'ō-kwin'ō-lōn),
A class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, well absorbed orally, with good tissue penetration and relatively long duration of action.

Fluoroquinolone antibiotics inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase, which is necessary for the replication of DNA as well as of plasmids involved in certain types of bacterial resistance. Nalidixic acid, a nonfluorinated quinolone, has been used since the 1960s to treat urinary tract infections, but its value is limited by poor systemic distribution, lack of action against gram-positive organisms, and rapid development of bacterial resistance. In contrast, the fluoroquinolones, which contain a fluorine atom, quickly achieve therapeutic concentration in plasma, tissues, and urine after oral administration and are active against some gram-positive bacteria. Although the fluorine atom also retards the development of bacterial resistance, widespread use of fluoroquinolones during the 1990s led to a significant and continuing rise in resistance among aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Second- and third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, bacterial rhinosinusitis, and urinary tract infections. Several of these agents are approved for single-dose oral treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea. They are generally inactive against anaerobes and beta-hemolytic streptococci. Trovafloxacin, the only fourth-generation fluoroquinolone currently available, has the broadest spectrum, including anaerobic organisms that cause intraabdominal and pelvic infections. Its usefulness is limited, however, by a high risk of hepatotoxicity. The fluoroquinolones are generally well tolerated. The most frequent side effects are nausea, abdominal distress, dizziness, and insomnia. Elimination is primarily renal, and dosage must be adjusted for patients with renal failure. The drugs accumulate in articular cartilage and can can cause severe damage during rapid growth of that tissue; hence, they are contraindicated in patients younger than 18. Blood dyscrasias and renal toxicity have occasionally been observed. Use during strenuous exercise may be hazardous to joints and can cause tendon rupture. These drugs can interfere with the hepatic biotransformation of theophylline and warfarin.

fluoroquinolone

/flu·o·ro·quin·o·lone/ (-kwin´o-lōn) any of a subgroup of fluorine-substituted quinolones, having a broader spectrum of activity than nalidixic acid.

fluoroquinolone

(flo͝or′ə-kwĭn′ə-lōn′, flôr′-)
n.
Any of a group of broad-spectrum antibiotics that are fluorinated quinolones, the first of which was nalidixic acid.

fluoroquinolone

[floo͡′okwin′olōn]
any of a subgroup of quinolones that contain one or more fluorine atoms attached to the central ring system that have a broader spectrum of antibiotic activity than quinolones. Examples include nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin (Cipro).

fluoroquinolone

Antibiotics A quinolone with an added flourine on the parent quinolone structure. See Quinolone.

fluor·o·quin·o·lone

(flōr'ō-kwin'ō-lōn)
A class of antibiotics with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, well absorbed orally, with good tissue penetration and relatively long duration of action.

antibiotic 

1. Pertaining to the ability to destroy or inhibit other living organisms.
2. A substance derived from a mould or bacterium, or produced synthetically, that destroys (bactericidal) or inhibits the growth (bacteriostatic) of other microorganisms and is thus used to treat infections. Some substances have a narrow spectrum of activity whereas others act against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms (broad-spectrum antibiotics). Antibiotics can be classified into several groups according to their mode of action on or within bacteria: (1) Drugs inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis, such as bacitracin, vancomycin and the β-lactams based agents (e.g. penicillin, cephalosporins (e.g. ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime). (2) Drugs affecting the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, such as polymyxin B sulfate and gramicidin. (3) Drugs inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis, such as aminoglycosides (e.g. amikacin sulfate, framycetin sulfate, gentamicin, neomycin sulfate and tobramycin), tetracyclines, macrolides (e.g. erythromycin and azithromycin) and chloramphenicol. (4) Drugs inhibiting the intermediate metabolism of bacteria, such as sulfonamides (e.g. sulfacetamide sodium) and trimethoprim. (5) Drugs inhibiting bacterial DNA synthesis, such as nalixidic acid and fluoroquinolones (e.g. ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). (6) Other antibiotics such as fusidic acid, the diamidines, such as propamidine isethionate and dibrompropamidine. Syn. antibacterial. See antiinflammatory drug; fusidic acid.

fluoroquinolone

a group of antibiotics which exert their antimicrobial effects by inhibiting bacterial DNA gyrase. They are effective primarily against gram-negative organisms. Includes ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, enrofloxacin.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the fact that the panel recognized that the risks outweigh the benefits in fluoroquinolones is a big win for victims of fluoroquinolones.
Key clinical point: Fluoroquinolones may result in better clinical outcomes in adults with community-acquired pneumonia due to Haemophilus influenzae.
Moreover, treatment history was not available for patients in our dataset; therefore, increased fluoroquinolone resistance could not be correlated with prior fluoroquinolone use.
In India, fluoroquinolones are widely available for the treatment of other bacterial infections.
Fluoroquinolones were used most often for UTIs by family practitioners, internists, and emergency physicians, and nitrofurans by ob.
The FDA approved gatifloxacin, an advanced-generation fluoroquinolone, in December 1999 for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis, acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis, uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections, uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, and pyelonephritis.
Studies of the Efficacy of a New Fluoroquinolone, JNJ-Q2, in Skin, Respiratory, and Systemic Murine Models of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus Pneumoniae Infection.
She was later diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disorder directly related to the fluoroquinolone antibiotics she took.
Fluoroquinolone antibiotics, commonly used to treat veterinary infections by E.
In several studies, acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance in C.
Citing the risk of serious tendon injury associated with Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin), and other fluoroquinolone antibiotics, Public Citizen filed its labeling request with the FDA on August 29, 2006.
In 2005, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned fluoroquinolone use in U.