fluorine


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fluorine

 (F) [floor´ēn]
a chemical element, atomic number 9, atomic weight 18.998. (See Appendix 6.)
fluorine 18 a radioactive isotope of fluorine, atomic mass 18, having a half-life of 1.8925 hours; it has been used as a tracer in positron emission tomography.

fluor·ine (F),

(flōr'ēn), Avoid the mispronunciation fluorīne.
A gaseous chemical element, atomic no. 9, atomic wt. 18.9984032; 18F (half-life of 1.83 h) is used as a diagnostic aid in various tissue scans.
[L. fluere, flow]

fluorine

/flu·o·rine/ (F) (floor´ēn) a chemical element, at. no. 9.

fluorine (F)

[floo͡r′ēn, flo̅o̅′ərēn]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
an element of the halogen family and the most reactive of the nonmetals. Its atomic number is 9, and its atomic mass is 19.00. It occurs in nature only as a component of substances such as fluorspar, cryolite, and phosphate rocks. It can be prepared by the electrolytic decomposition of hydrogen fluoride and in its pure form is a pale yellow toxic gas 1.6 times heavier than air. It is also a component of very stable fluorocarbons used in the manufacture of resins and plastics. As a component of fluorides, it is widely distributed throughout the soils of the earth, enters plants, is ingested by humans, and is absorbed from the GI tract. Fluorides in the atmosphere and industrial dust are absorbed by the lungs and the skin. Relatively soluble compounds, such as sodium fluoride, are almost completely absorbed by humans. The relatively insoluble compounds, such as cryolite, are poorly absorbed. Small amounts of sodium fluoride are added to the water supply of many communities to harden tooth enamel and decrease dental caries. Excessive amounts of fluoride can mottle tooth enamel and cause osteosclerosis. Acute fluoride poisoning and death can result from the accidental ingestion of insecticides and rodenticides containing fluoride salts.

fluor·ine

(F) (flōr-ēn')
A gaseous chemical element; atomic no. 9, atomic weight 18.9984032; 18F (half-life of 1.83 hours) is used as a diagnostic aid in various tissue scans.

fluor·ine

(F) (flōr-ēn')
A gaseous chemical element used as a diagnostic aid in various tissue scans.

fluorine

(flŏŏr´ēn),
n an element of the halogen family and the most reactive of the nonmetals. Its atomic number is 9, and its atomic weight is 19. Small amounts of sodium fluoride added to the public water supply will reduce the incidence of dental caries, particularly among children. Excessive amounts of fluoride can mottle tooth enamel and cause osteosclerosis. Acute fluoride poisoning can cause death.

fluorine

a chemical element, atomic number 9, atomic weight 18.998, symbol F. See Table 6.

fluorine poisoning
References in periodicals archive ?
The effect of fluorine content on the thermal stability of the latex film was investigated by comparing the TGA curves of the fluorine-containing PSA latex with different content of fluorine monomers, and the results are shown in Fig.
They found that the fluorine density in oolong tea was high, on a par with tea beverages.
Once the government could be seen as approving this chemical to "protect" our children's dental health, it became impossible for attorneys to convince juries of the widespread and lethal toxicity of fluorine compounds.
Two stimuli led to increased research into the fluorine atom and to very much increased manufacture.
0001 nm) of six wavelengths of a molecular fluorine laser of the type to be used for production of integrated circuits.
an Osaka-based high-technology maker of graphite-based goods, is more compact than conventional generators, allowing it to be installed inside makers' factories and freeing them from the need to transport fluorine from large factories specializing in its manufacture.
As a result, Western Europe will be the slowest growing region, despite relatively healthy gains in demand for fluoropolymers and other specialty fluorine chemicals.
The seven materials are fluorine, lead, arsenic, sexivalent chrome, dichloromethane, nitrite nitrogen and boron, it said.
If Maduro is right, then the mix of volcanoes, sea salt, and biomass burning should give us a varying ratio of chlorine and sodium based upon the frequency of volcanic eruptions and forest fires; moreover, there should not be much fluorine in the mix.
When gaseous fluorine is released into the atmosphere it will react with the moisture in the air and form hydrogen fluoride following either of these two equations (5).
Few toxic agents are as widely distributed in the air, in water, and in food which affect as many organs of the body and also damage plants and organisms -- as is fluorine, an element that is now being widely added as inorganic fluorides to municipal water supplies.