fluoride


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Related to fluoride: fluoride toothpaste, Fluoride poisoning

fluoride

 [floor´īd]
any binary compound of fluorine.
fluoride poisoning a toxic condition that sometimes occurs with ingestion of excessive fluoride. Acute fluoride poisoning involves an immediate physiological reaction, with nausea, vomiting, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Chronic fluoride poisoning is a physiological reaction to long term exposure to high levels of fluoride and is characterized by dental fluorosis, skeletal fluorosis, and kidney damage. Called also fluorosis.
systemic fluoride a fluoride ingested in water, supplements, or some other form. See also fluoridation.
topical fluoride a fluoride applied directly to the teeth, especially of children, in a dental caries prevention program.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd),
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

[floo͡r′īd]
an anion of fluorine. Fluoride compounds are introduced into drinking water or applied directly to the teeth to prevent tooth decay.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical; the anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

a compound of fluorine that replaces hydroxyl groups in teeth and bones and reduces the tendency to tooth decay. Its therapeutic use was discovered accidentally at Bauxite, Arkansas, when water containing fluoride was replaced by water lacking fluoride, resulting in an increase of dental cavities in children. See FLUORIDATION, DENTAL CARIES.

Fluoride

A chemical compound containing fluorine that is used to treat water or applied directly to teeth to prevent decay.

fluoride,

n a mineral important in bone formation used for the treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of tooth decay. Overdose can produce tooth mottling, joint pain, stomach pain, and nausea.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride(s)

(flŏŏr´īd),
n a salt of hydrofluoric acid, commonly sodium or stannous (tin).
fluoride dietary supplements,
n.pl the orally administered nutritional additives of the chemical fluoride; often taken by individuals without regular access to a fluoridated water supply; available as chewable tablets, drops, pills, and in combination with vitamin supplements. See also fluoride drops.
fluoride drops,
n a supplemental liquid form of the chemical fluoride. They can be administered to children from 6 months to 3 years of age but are not usually recommended because most children are exposed to normal levels of fluoride in their water systems at home and school and in their beverages.
fluoride, stannous,
n a compound of tin and fluorine used in dentifrices to prevent caries.
fluoride tablets/lozenges,
n.pl the supplemental forms of the chemical fluoride. Tablets must be chewed, and lozenges must be held in the oral cavity until dissolved in order to benefit from the fluoride's contact with the teeth.
fluoride toxicity,
n poisoning as a result of ingesting too much fluoride. Symptoms range from upset stomach to death.
fluoride varnish,
n a topical resin containing fluoride that is thinly applied to the tooth surface and used as a preventive treatment for caries. Can also be used as a desensitizing agent to treat dentinal hypersensitivity by temporarily blocking dentinal tubules.
fluorides, topical,
n.pl the salts of hydrofluoric acid (usually sodium or tin salts) that may be applied in solution to the exposed dental surfaces to prevent dental caries and promote remineralization. They can be applied by trays or mouthrinses or by techniques such as paint-on.
fluorides, topical, paint-on technique,
n a professionally administered procedure in which the exposed dental surfaces are coated with a fluoride solution or gel or varnish to prevent caries and promote remineralization.

fluoride

any binary compound of fluorine. See also fluorine.
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of methods describe the analysis of total fluoride in dentifrice [3, 11-13].
Now available on DVD, the documentary examines the "science" behind fluoride and how it affects the body, particularly neurological health and features top fluoride experts, including Dr.
Researchers reached the conclusion that the benefits of naturally occurring fluoride could be replicated in areas where the level of natural fluoride was low, by artificially increasing the measure to an optimal level of 1ppm.
Singanan has investigated Tridax procumbens, which is commonly used as a medicinal herb in India, as a biocarbon absorbent for fluoride.
The concentrations of fluorides selected for removal from freshwater were 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 ppm, that correspond to the levels of fluorides available in the natural waters of the fluoride infested areas in Guntur and Nalgonda districts of Andhra Pradesh.
03ml fluoride gels applied with a disposable plastic syringe.
Until simple and low-cost defluoridation methods for use at the household level are fully developed, the excessive dietary intake of fluoride will continue to be a health problem in low-income countries.
To counter the lawsuit (and protect its secret bomb program), the Pentagon conspired to redefine fluoride emissions as "benign.
Arian Collins from the San Diego Water Department said health isn't the main reason for putting fluoride in the water.
With the purpose of reinforcing dental hygienists' role in assessing patients' use of fluoridated products and varied sources of drinking water, this article will review the impact of fluoridated water on tooth decay, discuss the current guidelines on fluoride use and the fluoride content of frequently accessed water sources, and provide resources regarding fluoride sources for the dental team and patients.
Fluoride has also been reported to cause birth defects and perinatal deaths, impaired immune system, acute adverse reactions, severe skeletal fluorosis at high levels, osteo- arthritis, acute poisoning and contributes to the development of repetitive stress injury.
In chronic fluoride toxicity, the major manifestation of chronic ingestion of excess amounts of fluoride can result in significant enamel defects known as dental fluorosis.