fluoridation


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fluoridation

 [floor″-ĭ-da´shun]
treatment with fluorides; the addition of fluorides to community drinking water as a measure to reduce the incidence of dental caries. Minute traces of fluoride are found in almost all food, but the quantity apparently is too small to meet the requirements of the body in building tooth enamel that resists cavities. Drinking water containing one part fluoride to one million parts of water does meet this need and has been found to reduce tooth decay in children by as much as 40 per cent. Since few natural water supplies contain the necessary amount of fluoride, it usually must be added if protection against tooth decay is desired. Statistics indicate that 20 per cent of the teenagers who drank fluoridated water from birth have teeth totally free of caries. The practice of fluoridating water is rated among the most cost-effective preventive programs in public health.

There also is evidence that topically applied fluoride solutions help alleviate periodontal disease by removing bacteria from the site and rebuilding supporting bone tissue around the teeth. Dental professionals may apply fluoride solutions directly to a child's teeth, beginning at age 5 or 6 and repeating the treatment each year throughout life. This has been found to reduce caries by about 40 per cent.

The dentist or other health care provider may prescribe chewable fluoride tablets if fluoride is not available in drinking water. However, use of these tablets must be carefully supervised, since an excess of fluoride causes dental fluorosis. Like most medicines, fluoride in large amounts is a poison. A dentifrice containing fluoride, or fluoride in gel form, may also prove effective. A dentist or dental hygienist should be consulted before any fluoride preparation is used.

fluor·i·da·tion

(flōr'i-dā'shŭn),
Addition of fluorides to a community water supply, usually about 1 ppm, to reduce incidence of dental decay.

fluoridation

/flu·o·ri·da·tion/ (floor″ĭ-da´shun) treatment with fluorides; the addition of fluorides to a public water supply as a public health measure to reduce the incidence of dental caries.

fluoridation

[floo͡r′idā′shən]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
the process of adding fluoride, especially to a public water supply, to reduce tooth decay.

fluoridation

The addition of small amounts of fluoride to drinking water to reduce the incidence of cavities.
 
Fringe medicine
It is widely believed by those interested in alternative health that the addition of fluoride to the drinking water causes AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, birth defects, cancer and a wide range of other conditions.
 
Public health
While most data suggest that fluoridation may reduce the incidence of caries, it is unclear whether fluoride actually has this effect; soft data suggest possible carcinogenesis. More than 1/2 of the US water supply has > 0.7 ppm of fluoride, a level that is considered adequate to reduce the incidence of caries.

fluor·i·da·tion

(flōr'i-dā'shŭn)
Addition of fluorides to a community water supply, usually 1 ppm or less, to reduce incidence of dental decay.

fluoridation

Deliberate addition of fluorine compounds to drinking water supplies in areas in which the water is low in fluoride. The presence of about one part of fluoride per million parts of water promotes stronger and healthier teeth with reduced tendency to tooth decay. Fluoridation is a valuable public health measure.

fluoridation

the addition of a fluoride, usually sodium fluoride, to drinking water in a concentration of about 1 ppm, in order to reduce the decay of teeth. Teeth may also be treated directly with a fluoride gel by the dentist, and this is usually undertaken as a treatment for children.

fluoridation,

n the technique of infusing public water supply with fluoride to reduce dental decay.

fluor·i·da·tion

(flōr'i-dā'shŭn)
Addition of fluorides to a community water supply, usually about 1 ppm, to reduce incidence of dental decay.

fluoridation,

n 1. the process of adding fluoride to a public water supply to reduce dental caries.
2. the use of a fluoride to prevent caries and promote remineralization; may be by means of communal water supplies; oral hygiene preparations for home use; or topical applications.

fluoridation

treatment with fluorides; the addition of fluorides to drinking water as a measure to reduce the incidence of dental caries in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The design and installation of Buda's proposed fluoridation system would cost nearly $52,000, according to a city report.
The benefits and safety of fluoridation of public drinking water supplies are supported by overwhelming scientific evidence, including studies by the World Health Organization, Center for Disease Control (USA) and the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia).
The economic benefits of fluoridation were calculated based on health care costs, productivity losses and other losses.
The AD HA supports community water fluoridation as a safe and effective method for reducing the incidence of dental caries throughout the human lifespan, and supports education regarding its preventive and therapeutic benefits, safety and cost effectiveness.
Nor does he tell us that Dr John Colquhoun a principal dental officer in Auckland, New Zealand, switched from being a keen advocate of fluoridation to being an opponent when he obtained the decay rates for all children in all the fluoridated and all the nonfluoridated areas as well as the decay rates for all children in the recently defluoridated region, and found there was virtually no differences in tooth decay rates related to fluoridation.
Over the past seven decades, water fluoridation has played an important role in the dramatic reduction of tooth decay and has been identified by CDC as one of 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century.
In countries such as Lebanon, where water fluoridation would be impractical, salt fluoridation has been used instead.
Fluoridation of community drinking water is a major factor responsible for the decline in dental caries (tooth decay) during the second half of the 20th century.
The claim that the Nazis used fluoridation in concentration camps has been widely rejected by sceptic websites (13, 14) as there is no evidence for these claims, which appear to be anecdotal.
I urge people to look into this controversial issue and decide for themselves as fluoridation gives absolutely no control over any individual's fluoride intake.
When the battle to stop fluoridation in Hamilton's water supply welled up in recent years, the news media fell over themselves to act as mouthpieces for the Ministry of Health, trotting out officials in white coats assuring the public that fluoridation was a key weapon in fighting child tooth decay.