fluoridation


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fluoridation

 [floor″-ĭ-da´shun]
treatment with fluorides; the addition of fluorides to community drinking water as a measure to reduce the incidence of dental caries. Minute traces of fluoride are found in almost all food, but the quantity apparently is too small to meet the requirements of the body in building tooth enamel that resists cavities. Drinking water containing one part fluoride to one million parts of water does meet this need and has been found to reduce tooth decay in children by as much as 40 per cent. Since few natural water supplies contain the necessary amount of fluoride, it usually must be added if protection against tooth decay is desired. Statistics indicate that 20 per cent of the teenagers who drank fluoridated water from birth have teeth totally free of caries. The practice of fluoridating water is rated among the most cost-effective preventive programs in public health.

There also is evidence that topically applied fluoride solutions help alleviate periodontal disease by removing bacteria from the site and rebuilding supporting bone tissue around the teeth. Dental professionals may apply fluoride solutions directly to a child's teeth, beginning at age 5 or 6 and repeating the treatment each year throughout life. This has been found to reduce caries by about 40 per cent.

The dentist or other health care provider may prescribe chewable fluoride tablets if fluoride is not available in drinking water. However, use of these tablets must be carefully supervised, since an excess of fluoride causes dental fluorosis. Like most medicines, fluoride in large amounts is a poison. A dentifrice containing fluoride, or fluoride in gel form, may also prove effective. A dentist or dental hygienist should be consulted before any fluoride preparation is used.

fluor·i·da·tion

(flōr'i-dā'shŭn),
Addition of fluorides to a community water supply, usually about 1 ppm, to reduce incidence of dental decay.

fluoridation

/flu·o·ri·da·tion/ (floor″ĭ-da´shun) treatment with fluorides; the addition of fluorides to a public water supply as a public health measure to reduce the incidence of dental caries.

fluoridation

[floo͡r′idā′shən]
Etymology: L, fluere, to flow
the process of adding fluoride, especially to a public water supply, to reduce tooth decay.

fluoridation

The addition of small amounts of fluoride to drinking water to reduce the incidence of cavities.
 
Fringe medicine
It is widely believed by those interested in alternative health that the addition of fluoride to the drinking water causes AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, birth defects, cancer and a wide range of other conditions.
 
Public health
While most data suggest that fluoridation may reduce the incidence of caries, it is unclear whether fluoride actually has this effect; soft data suggest possible carcinogenesis. More than 1/2 of the US water supply has > 0.7 ppm of fluoride, a level that is considered adequate to reduce the incidence of caries.

fluor·i·da·tion

(flōr'i-dā'shŭn)
Addition of fluorides to a community water supply, usually 1 ppm or less, to reduce incidence of dental decay.

fluoridation

Deliberate addition of fluorine compounds to drinking water supplies in areas in which the water is low in fluoride. The presence of about one part of fluoride per million parts of water promotes stronger and healthier teeth with reduced tendency to tooth decay. Fluoridation is a valuable public health measure.

fluoridation

the addition of a fluoride, usually sodium fluoride, to drinking water in a concentration of about 1 ppm, in order to reduce the decay of teeth. Teeth may also be treated directly with a fluoride gel by the dentist, and this is usually undertaken as a treatment for children.

fluoridation,

n the technique of infusing public water supply with fluoride to reduce dental decay.

fluor·i·da·tion

(flōr'i-dā'shŭn)
Addition of fluorides to a community water supply, usually about 1 ppm, to reduce incidence of dental decay.

fluoridation,

n 1. the process of adding fluoride to a public water supply to reduce dental caries.
2. the use of a fluoride to prevent caries and promote remineralization; may be by means of communal water supplies; oral hygiene preparations for home use; or topical applications.

fluoridation

treatment with fluorides; the addition of fluorides to drinking water as a measure to reduce the incidence of dental caries in humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
The finding that water fluoridation has a beneficial effect in the presence of other sources of F [Mc Donagh et al.
The York scientists called for further studies into possible adverse health effects of fluoridation but these have not been carried out.
When one of their members, Donna Frye, dared to raise questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of water fluoridation in the subsequent meeting, she was forcefully silenced by the other members
In 2000, the University of York published a report which concluded the fluoridation of water increased the number of children without tooth decay by 15%.
Contact your MP and ask that Carolyn Flint is informed that you, too, should have the right to choice over the fluoridation of your water.
It is seeking a fully independent public inquiry into fluoridation.
Fluoridation programs are usually implemented by independent municipal choice, although a few states make it mandatory.
Both recent Government commissioned reviews on fluoridation by York University (2000)and the Medical Research Council (2002) recommended measuring existing fluoride exposure levels.
After Germany reunified in 1990, however, the country's eastern states suspended fluoridation, which hadn't caught on with their western counterparts.
In an article in the November 2001 issue of the Canadian Dental Association Journal, Howard Cohen and David Locker write, "Although current studies indicate that water fluoridation continues to be beneficial, recent reviews have shown that the quality of the evidence provided by these studies is poor.