fluorescent in situ hybridization


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hybridization

 [hi″brid-ĭ-za´shun]
1. the production of hybrids.
fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) a genetic mapping technique using fluorescent tags for analysis of chromosomal aberrations and genetic abnormalities. Called also chromosome painting.
molecular hybridization in molecular biology, formation of a partially or wholly complementary nucleic acid duplex by association of single strands, usually between DNA and RNA strands or previously unassociated DNA strands, but also between RNA strands; used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands.

fluorescent in situ hybridization

a method used to determine the chromosomal location or expression pattern of genomic DNA or cDNA fragments. The piece of DNA to be mapped (the "probe") is labeled with a fluorescent dye and hybridized to a chromosome preparation or to a tissue section. The probe anneals to complementary DNA or RNA sequences. Examination of the chromosomes or tissue section under a fluorescence microscope reveals the number, size, and location of the target sequences.

fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH)

a genetic mapping technique using fluorescent tags for analysis of chromosomal aberrations and genetic abnormalities. Also called chromosome painting.
Cardiology Finnish Isradipine Study In Hypertension
Molecular medicine Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization. A method for locating a segment of DNA on a chromosome. The DNA is labeled with a fluorescent dye and hybridized to a cytological preparation of chromosomes that has been denatured to allow nucleic acid hybridization between chromosomal DNA and the probe. The site of hybridization is determined by fluorescent microscopy. FISH is a hybrid of 3 technologies: cytogenetics, fluorescence microscopy, and DNA hybridization, which is used to determine cell ploidy and detect chromosome segments by evaluating interphase—non-dividing—nuclei; in FISH, fluoresceinated chromosome probes are used for cytologic analysis and cytogenetic studies, and to detect intratumoral heterogeneity. In genetics, FISH provides a physical mapping approach to detect hybridization of probes with metaphase chromosomes and with the less-condensed somatic interphase chromatin
DNA probes may be applied to cell preparations on a slide; if the complementary DNA sequence is present, it binds to DNA and can be detected by light microscopy; FISH labels probes nonradioactively either directly with fluorochromes, or indirectly with biotin and fluorochrome-labeled avidin, with digoxeginin and fluorochrome-labeled anti-digoxeginin, or others; the use of multiple band-pass filters allows simultaneous viewing of numerous probes for different chromosomal sequences labeled with different fluorochromes; FISH is useful in cytogenetic studies, where probes for particular chromosomes—e.g., chromosomes 13, 18, 21—or chromosomal regions—e.g., ABL and BCR genes in the Philadelphia translocation—can be used for the prenatal diagnosis of common aneuploidies or to detect early stages of lymphoproliferative disorders; FISH is as sensitive as other analytical techniques—e.g., conventional cytology and flow cytometry, used to diagnose transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder
Pros FISH is simpler, less labor-intensive, and time-consuming—48 hours—than classic cytogenetics—karyotyping—2-3 weeks
Cons Only one question can be asked at a time, i.e., rather than asking ‘global issues’—e.g., what is the genetic composition of a population of cells

fluor·es·cent in si·tu hy·brid·i·za·tion

, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (flōr-es'ĕnt in sit'ū hī'brid-ī-zā'shŭn, flōr-es'ĕns)
A method used to determine the chromosomal location or expression pattern of genomic DNA or cDNA fragments. The piece of DNA to be mapped (the "probe") is labeled with a fluorescent dye and hybridized to a chromosome preparation or to a tissue section. The probe anneals to complementary DNA or RNA sequences. Examination of the chromosomes or tissue section under a fluorescence microscope reveals the number, size, and location of the target sequences.
References in periodicals archive ?
Application of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for the detection of Helicobacter pilori.
Improved permeabilization protocols for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of mycolicacid-containing bacteria found in foams.
Traditional immunodiagnostic products are being replaced by techniques such as in situ hybridization (ISH), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, and sequencing technologies that are much more capable of assessing the presence and prognosis of cancer's complex molecular profile.
Keywords in this release: molecular testing, diagnostic assays, pharmacogenomic, infectious disease, cancer diagnostics, hepatitis C virus, HCV, genotyping, clinical validation, in vitro diagnostic, IVD, human papilloma virus, HPV, hepatitis B virus, HBV, Hepatitis C virus, HCV, situ hybridization, ISH, fluorescent in situ hybridization, FISH, single-nucleotide polymorphism, SNP, sequencing technologies, research, information, market, trends, technology, service, forecast
This assay is the first "repeat-free" BCR/ABL four color fluorescent in situ hybridization (F-FISH) probe and it is CGI's first product to be introduced into the United States.
PGD for detection of aneuploidies and unbalanced translocations utilizes fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), in which a DNA probe that is coupled with a colored fluorescent marker is hybridized to the DNA in the test sample.
It is the first system for anatomical pathology laboratories that allows users to simultaneously run immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for protein detection and in situ Hybridization (ISH) and Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) testing for DNA and RNA detection, adding significant flexibility and substantial throughput improvements.
PGD for detection of aneuploidies and unbalanced translocations utilizes fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in which a DNA probe that is coupled with a colored fluorescent marker is hybridized to the DNA in the test sample.
The system will be used for the imaging of fixed tissue sections and / or Entire embryonic organs, to detect antibody stainings, fluorescent in situ hybridizations as well as endogenously overexpressed fluorescent reporter proteins.
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