fluorescence microscopy


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fluorescence

 [floo͡-res´ens]
the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.
fluorescence microscopy the use of a fluorescence microscope to identify microorganisms or specific tissue constituents that have been stained with a fluorochrome or a fluorochrome-labeled substance (such as an antibody to a tissue antigen). A fluorescent antibody test can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria. See also immunofluorescence.

microscopy

 [mi-kros´kah-pe]
examination with a microscope.
fluorescence microscopy conjugation of antibodies with fluorescent dyes in order to identify specific microorganisms or tissue constituents; see also fluorescence microscopy.

fluor·es·cence mi·cros·co·py

a procedure based on the fact that fluorescent materials emit visible light when they are irradiated with ultraviolet or violet-blue visible rays; some materials manifest this property naturally, whereas others may be treated with fluorescent solutions (somewhat analogous to staining); when the absorption of the specimen is in the relatively long ultraviolet range a filter that transmits these radiations is used, and a yellow filter is placed on or in the ocular; the background field is then dark, and any yellow or red fluorescence becomes visible.

fluorescence microscopy

n.
Microscopy using naturally fluorescent or treated materials that emit visible light when they are irradiated with ultraviolet or violet-blue visible rays.

fluor·es·cence mi·cros·co·py

(flōr-es'ĕns mī-kros'kŏ-pē)
A procedure based on the fact that fluorescent materials emit visible light when they are irradiated with ultraviolet or violet-blue visible rays; some materials manifest this property naturally, whereas others may be treated with fluorescent solutions (somewhat analogous to staining).

fluorescence microscopy

a method of microscopy in which fluorescent dyes are used to mark certain structures (e.g. nucleic acids) which can then be viewed with an ultraviolet microscope.

fluorescence

the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.

fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)
an instrument for analysis (FACscan) and separating mixed populations of cells after labeling individual cell-specific surface antigens with fluorescent antibody. The individual cells in droplets are passed through a laser beam; the droplet is deflected into one of two or more collection vessels depending upon which fluorescent antibody is bound to its surface. Two or more different fluorescent antibodies are used.
fluorescence microscopy
the use of techniques for conjugating antibodies with fluorescent dyes in order to identify specific microorganisms or tissue constituents using a fluorescence microscope. Fluorescent antibody (FA) techniques can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria and viruses. There are two major types of FA techniques, direct and indirect, both of which are based on the antigen-antibody reaction in which the antibody attaches itself to its specific antigen.
In the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) method, the antibody is bound to the antigen, for example, a bacterial cell in a smear, and cannot be easily removed by elution (washing). The antibody remains attached to the cell after all other serum proteins have been washed away. Since the antibody has been rendered fluorescent by conjugation with fluorescein or another dye, the outline of the bacterial cell that it coats can readily be seen with a special microscope.
In the indirect method (IFA), the specific antibody is allowed to react with the antigen. The slide is then washed and treated with a labeled antibody to the specific antibody. For example, if the specific antibody was raised in a rabbit, it is then treated with fluorescein-labeled anti-rabbit globulin, which results in a combination of this labeled antibody with the rabbit immunoglobulin already attached to the antigen.
Fluorescent antibody studies have been used in the detection of numerous bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan infections and in the identification and localization of many tissue antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company manufactures a line of complete blood count analyzers and fluorescence microscopy products.
Advantages of LED in Fluorescence Microscopy Now that high-performance LEDs provide sufficient intensity at the specific wavelengths required for many applications, fluorescence microscopy is able to take advantage of the benefits of LEDs, including their compact size, low power consumption, minimal heat output, fast switching and adjusting properties, high emission stability and extremely long life span.
Enhancement of optical resolution by 4pi single and multiphoton confocal fluorescence microscopy
The laws of physics have limited the resolution of fluorescence microscopy, whereby a fluorescent marker is used to distinguish specific proteins, to about 200 nanometers.
The FluoView FV1000 confocal microscope, with features including the SIM scanner and UIS2 optics, now includes a peerless Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) module.
MLO: You have written about the great advances in fluorescence microscopy in the last 25 years.
The growing field cell-based research provides good growth prospects for Olympus' fluorescence microscopy business, for which Soft Imaging has been an important partner.
For example, in the first edition in 1971, the author included a chapter on fluorescence microscopy, and in the second edition in 1981, there was a chapter on fluorescence technique for the staining of Y-bodies in cancer of males.
In addition to the advances in fluorophore conjugation chemistry, special instrumentation has been developed to detect these fluorescent probes, for example, flow cytometers [8] and digital fluorescence microscopy and image analysis.
3] receptor IgG (1[degrees] antibody), followed by FITC-conjugated goat anti-rabbit IgG (2[degrees] antibody) and o bserved using fluorescence microscopy.
The cover slips were air-dried, mounted with glycerol buffer, and examined under fluorescence microscopy.
Using fluorescence microscopy and stained DNA, the scientists first watched individual DNA strands contort in ways predicted by the reptation theory, then tracked the molecule's twists and turns for up to 2 minutes at a time.

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