flow

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flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flo)
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the rate at which a fluid passes through an organ or part, expressed as volume per unit of time.

blood flow 
1. circulation (of the blood).
effective renal blood flow  (ERBF) that portion of the total blood flow through the kidneys that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
effective renal plasma flow  (ERPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the renal tubules per unit time, generally measured by the clearance rate of -aminohippurate.
forced expiratory flow  (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity.
maximum expiratory flow  the rate of airflow during a forced vital capacity maneuver, often specified at a given volume.
maximum midexpiratory flow  the average rate of airflow measured between exhaled volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced exhalation.
peak expiratory flow  (PEF) the greatest rate of airflow that can be achieved during forced exhalation beginning with the lungs fully inflated.
renal plasma flow  (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 10 per cent greater than the effective renal plasma flow.

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

1 the movement of a liquid or gas.
2 copious menstruation but less profuse than flooding.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(1) the volume of a fluid (liquid or gas) moving per unit time, e.g. blood flow to or through a region of the body, expressed in mL per minute; (2) in psychology, a state of complete involvement and focus on a task that occurs when there is a perfect match between one's skills and the demands of the task.

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]

flow,

n to move in a manner similar to a liquid stream.
flow, dental material,
n the continued deformation or change in shape under a static load, as with waxes and amalgam.
flow, traffic,
n the pattern of office personnel and patient movement from one area within the office to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
The second generic design uses two dissimilar gas meters with different responses to wet gas flows in series.
The peak flow rate during November's flood--the largest in the Grand Canyon since a similar headline-grabbing event in the spring of 1996--is almost equal to the rate during the average flood that the canyon experienced in the pre-dam era.
While traditional reinsurance and acquisitions provide a means of obtaining blocks of business, securitizations can provide access to insurance cash flows with less regulatory and marketing constraints.
This will lead to a less ideal flow and a somewhat lowered efficiency.
Udana vayu is a circular flow of breath around the neck and head.
In addition to the helix angles, the specific rotor wing geometries in the wing tip region were selected to further promote the above described flow patterns.
I started thinking about the laws of physics and everything I knew about laminar flow.
As it turns out, all cash flows are not created equal when it comes to boosting market capitalization.
In effect, two known inputs (predicted future cash flows and observed market value) are used to impute the apparent consensus market rate of return on the asset or liability.
Over the medium term, projected 2008 dividend cash flows to AEI are expected to cover debt service by slightly more than 4x on average.
Mumford, author of The Financial Numbers Game: Detecting Creative Accounting Practices, was clearly on to something when he wrote that "profit is an opinion, but cash flow is a fact.