flow

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flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flo)
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the rate at which a fluid passes through an organ or part, expressed as volume per unit of time.

blood flow 
1. circulation (of the blood).
effective renal blood flow  (ERBF) that portion of the total blood flow through the kidneys that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
effective renal plasma flow  (ERPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the renal tubules per unit time, generally measured by the clearance rate of -aminohippurate.
forced expiratory flow  (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity.
maximum expiratory flow  the rate of airflow during a forced vital capacity maneuver, often specified at a given volume.
maximum midexpiratory flow  the average rate of airflow measured between exhaled volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced exhalation.
peak expiratory flow  (PEF) the greatest rate of airflow that can be achieved during forced exhalation beginning with the lungs fully inflated.
renal plasma flow  (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 10 per cent greater than the effective renal plasma flow.

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

1 the movement of a liquid or gas.
2 copious menstruation but less profuse than flooding.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(1) the volume of a fluid (liquid or gas) moving per unit time, e.g. blood flow to or through a region of the body, expressed in mL per minute; (2) in psychology, a state of complete involvement and focus on a task that occurs when there is a perfect match between one's skills and the demands of the task.

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]

flow,

n to move in a manner similar to a liquid stream.
flow, dental material,
n the continued deformation or change in shape under a static load, as with waxes and amalgam.
flow, traffic,
n the pattern of office personnel and patient movement from one area within the office to another.
References in classic literature ?
But there are many other circumstances which evince that what I have alleged is the true cause of the motion of the blood: thus, in the first place, the difference that is observed between the blood which flows from the veins, and that from the arteries, can only arise from this, that being rarefied, and, as it were, distilled by passing through the heart, it is thinner, and more vivid, and warmer immediately after leaving the heart, in other words, when in the arteries, than it was a short time before passing into either, in other words, when it was in the veins; and if attention be given, it will be found that this difference is very marked only in the neighborhood of the heart; and is not so evident in parts more remote from it.
Their father was a rich man who lived in the strong city of Phere and was descended from the river Alpheus, whose broad stream flows through the land of the Pylians.
As the waters of New York flow either southerly into the Atlantic or northerly into Ontario and its outlet, Otsego Lake, being the source of the Susquehanna, is of necessity among its highest lands.
Here the mountain ridge which divides Wind River from the head waters of the Columbia and Spanish Rivers, ends abruptly, and winding to the north of east, becomes the dividing barrier between a branch of the Big Horn and Cheyenne Rivers, and those head waters which flow into the Missouri below the Sioux country.
Sometimes it flows one way, and sometimes the other.
Unwearying flows the sweet sound from their lips, and the house of their father Zeus the loud-thunderer is glad at the lily-like voice of the goddesses as it spread abroad, and the peaks of snowy Olympus resound, and the homes of the immortals.
As it flows it takes the forms of sappy leaves or vines, making heaps of pulpy sprays a foot or more in depth, and resembling, as you look down on them, the laciniated, lobed, and imbricated thalluses of some lichens; or you are reminded of coral, of leopard's paws or birds' feet, of brains or lungs or bowels, and excrements of all kinds.
His adversary had fallen senseless with excessive pain and the flow of blood, that gushed from an artery or a large vein.
When he opened his lips, he spoke in a rich bass voice, with an easy flow of language, and a strict attention to the elocutionary claims of words in more than one syllable.
Fountains and yee, that warble, as ye flow, Melodious murmurs, warbling tune his praise.
When they arrived there they went at once to the Lake, and this time the lions did not stir, nor did the springs flow, and neither did the Lake speak.
The most renowned of blossoms, most divine Of those whose conquering glances overthrow Cities and kingdoms, for his sake combine And win the ready smiles that ever flow From royal lips.