flow

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Related to flowed: soak up, deteriorating, overstep, gushes

flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flo)
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the rate at which a fluid passes through an organ or part, expressed as volume per unit of time.

blood flow 
1. circulation (of the blood).
effective renal blood flow  (ERBF) that portion of the total blood flow through the kidneys that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
effective renal plasma flow  (ERPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the renal tubules per unit time, generally measured by the clearance rate of -aminohippurate.
forced expiratory flow  (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity.
maximum expiratory flow  the rate of airflow during a forced vital capacity maneuver, often specified at a given volume.
maximum midexpiratory flow  the average rate of airflow measured between exhaled volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced exhalation.
peak expiratory flow  (PEF) the greatest rate of airflow that can be achieved during forced exhalation beginning with the lungs fully inflated.
renal plasma flow  (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 10 per cent greater than the effective renal plasma flow.

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

1 the movement of a liquid or gas.
2 copious menstruation but less profuse than flooding.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(1) the volume of a fluid (liquid or gas) moving per unit time, e.g. blood flow to or through a region of the body, expressed in mL per minute; (2) in psychology, a state of complete involvement and focus on a task that occurs when there is a perfect match between one's skills and the demands of the task.

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]

flow,

n to move in a manner similar to a liquid stream.
flow, dental material,
n the continued deformation or change in shape under a static load, as with waxes and amalgam.
flow, traffic,
n the pattern of office personnel and patient movement from one area within the office to another.
References in classic literature ?
Then her soul sat on her lips, and language flowed, from what source I cannot tell.
The sun shone yellow on its grey head, reminding me of summer; and I cannot say why, but all at once a gush of child's sensations flowed into my heart.
His audience, accordingly, gave him up in despair; and the kitchen small-talk flowed back into its ordinary channels, until the clock struck eight and startled the assembled servants into separating for their morning's work.
Conspicuous among these latter, like an animated bit of the spiked wall of Newgate, Jerry stood: aiming at the prisoner the beery breath of a whet he had taken as he came along, and discharging it to mingle with the waves of other beer, and gin, and tea, and coffee, and what not, that flowed at him, and already broke upon the great windows behind him in an impure mist and rain.
I stood in a window, and looked across the ancient street at the opposite houses, recalling how I had watched them on wet afternoons, when I first came there; and how I had used to speculate about the people who appeared at any of the windows, and had followed them with my eyes up and down stairs, while women went clicking along the pavement in pattens, and the dull rain fell in slanting lines, and poured out of the water-spout yonder, and flowed into the road.
The sun sank redly, flooding the land with blood; it was as though all the blood that Chaka had shed flowed about the land which Chaka ruled.