flow


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flow

 [flo]
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the amount of a fluid that passes through an organ or part in a specified time; called also flow rate.
forced expiratory flow (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity, usually calculated as an average flow over a given portion of the expiratory curve; the portion between 25 and 75 per cent of forced vital capacity is called the maximal midexpiratory flow. Called also forced expiratory flow rate.
laminar flow smooth, uninterrupted flow as of a gas through a tube.
maximal expiratory flow FEF200–1200; the rate of airflow at forced vital capacity, represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points 200 mL and 1200 mL on the forced expiratory volume curve. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal expiratory flow rate.
maximal midexpiratory flow FEF25–75; the maximum rate of airflow measured between expired volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced expiration; represented graphically as the slope of the line connecting the points on the forced expiratory volume curve at 25 and 75 per cent of the forced vital capacity. See also pulmonary function tests. Called also maximal midexpiratory flow rate.
renal plasma flow (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 90 per cent of the total constitutes the effective renal plasma flow, the portion that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
turbulent flow flow that is agitated or haphazard.

flow

(flō),
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time. In respiratory physiology, the symbol for gas flow is V and for blood flow is Q, followed by subscripts denoting location and chemical species.
4. In rheology, a permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flo)
1. the movement of a liquid or gas.
2. the rate at which a fluid passes through an organ or part, expressed as volume per unit of time.

blood flow 
1. circulation (of the blood).
effective renal blood flow  (ERBF) that portion of the total blood flow through the kidneys that perfuses functional renal tissue such as the glomeruli.
effective renal plasma flow  (ERPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the renal tubules per unit time, generally measured by the clearance rate of -aminohippurate.
forced expiratory flow  (FEF) the rate of airflow recorded in measurements of forced vital capacity.
maximum expiratory flow  the rate of airflow during a forced vital capacity maneuver, often specified at a given volume.
maximum midexpiratory flow  the average rate of airflow measured between exhaled volumes of 25 and 75 per cent of the vital capacity during a forced exhalation.
peak expiratory flow  (PEF) the greatest rate of airflow that can be achieved during forced exhalation beginning with the lungs fully inflated.
renal plasma flow  (RPF) the amount of plasma that perfuses the kidneys per unit time, approximately 10 per cent greater than the effective renal plasma flow.

flow

(flō)
v.
1. To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.
2. To circulate, as the blood in the body.
3. To menstruate.
n.
1. The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.
2. Menstrual discharge.

flow

1 the movement of a liquid or gas.
2 copious menstruation but less profuse than flooding.

flow

(flō)
1. To bleed from the uterus less profusely than in flooding.
2. The menstrual discharge.
3. Movement of a liquid or gas; specifically, the volume of liquid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.
4. rheology A permanent deformation of a body that proceeds with time.
[A.S. flōwan]

flow

(flō)
Movement of a liquid or gas;
[A.S. flōwan]
References in periodicals archive ?
For gas meters that do exhibit repeatable and reproducible wet gas flow responses, a considerable amount of flow testing is required to gather the required data to form a mathematical prediction method to account for the liquid's effect.
Another source is insufficient venting at the flow line.
We believe that applying basic flow principles, combined with Barry Green and Timothy Gallwey's "inner game" theory (12) and related approaches for keeping one's attention in the present, hold much potential for helping musicians play in deeply rewarding ways.
a geochemist at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, was part of a group that made three datagathering rafting trips down the river--one just before the planned release, one beginning a week after the flow returned to baseline level, and one that shoved off about 5 weeks after the flood.
Therefore, you should ask more net worth questions when the client is weak on cash flow, and visa versa.
gt;From an investment perspective, the long-term nature of packaged insurance cash flows might be used to enhance asset/liability management techniques.
Can the foam filter, due to its inherent flow smoothing properties, simplify this system?
Sometimes a pump is operated at varying flows and thus will often not run at the ideal flow.
If a linebacker is to the side of flow, he is "Playside.
In addition to the helix angles, the specific rotor wing geometries in the wing tip region were selected to further promote the above described flow patterns.