flounder


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

flounder

members of the families Bothidae and Pleuronectidae; flatfish with eyes on the same side of the head.

flounder ulcer disease
progressive and sometimes fatal ulceration in greenback flounder and probably other species of flatfish. Caused by Aeromonas salmonicida. See also atypical aeromonassalmonicida.
References in classic literature ?
As he began to flounder ashore through the mud, I started to flounder out into it, going over the same course which the Chinese had taken in landing me and in returning to the junk.
Note: When I say "sitting", of course I do not mean any change of attitude such as you in Spaceland signify by that word; for as we have no feet, we can no more "sit" nor "stand"(in your sense of the word) than one of your soles or flounders.
and after one or two feeble flounders he crawls out again, limp and pitiable.
As you can well imagine, the bass, the flounders, the whitefish, and even the little anchovies all went together into the tub to keep the mullets company.
The first to dance in the hot oil were the mullets, the bass followed, then the whitefish, the flounders, and the anchovies.
It is expected that the new method will contribute to improving efficiency in flounder preservation.
For the statewide comparison, the investigators analyzed the mercury content of samples of three types of fish commonly available in New Jersey--tuna, flounder, and bluefish.
Elizabeth Neal, daughter of Capt Rob Neal, 436th APS, caught the third biggest fish, a flounder measuring 19 inches.
2) Summer flounder migrate annually to inshore estuarine and coastal areas during the summer and to offshore areas on the continental slope during winter.
The actor-director, who first made his name as Flounder in the 1978 film ``National Lampoon's Animal House,'' would gorge on plate after plate of ribs from the kickoff until the final seconds of the broadcast.
The Hudson River estuary provides habitat for juvenile winter flounder (Able et al.