florid

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flor·id

(flōr'id),
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]

florid

/flor·id/ (flor´id)
1. in full bloom; occurring in fully developed form.
2. having a bright red color.

florid

[flôr′id]
Etymology: L, floridus, flowery
in human skin complexion or wound appearance, a bright red color.

florid

adjective
(1) Exuberant; abundant, well-developed, as in a florid tissue response (e.g., to inflammation).
(2) A rarely used term for brightly coloured, reddish; erythematous.

flor·id

(flōr'id)
1. Of a bright red color; denoting certain cutaneous lesions.
2. Fully developed.
[L. floridus, flowery]

florid

Flushed, of ruddy complexion, rosy.
References in periodicals archive ?
When I visited Robert the next day, he was as floridly psychotic as I'd ever seen him.
Hueffers's as also most of details," while in the former he had acknowledged: "My share in this work is very small as far as actual writing goes," elsewhere his praise for Ford's writing is, according to Max Saunders, "so floridly ironic that it verges on sarcasm.
Later, too, Muller notes, Hopkins rejected Newman's "old Anglican, patristic, literary influence" for the "more floridly emotional Ultramontanist" stance shared by such church leaders as Cardinal Manning and the London Oratorian Frederick Faber.
He moved out of the rectory, floridly and expensively redecorated by his predecessor, and moved into the smaller, vacant convent.
In France, Proust and Gide had certainly broached the subject but even there the leap into the floridly detailed world of Jean Genet wouldn't come until Our Lady of the Flowers was more broadly issued by Gallimard in 1951.
Of these, the most outstanding was the floridly entitled Palace of the Commander of the Arsenal, a squat stone tower embellished with statues.
In the instance of the Garden of the Muses (1600; STC 3189), the metaphor supplied in the etymology of anthology is rather floridly extended:
At the time, she was floridly psychotic, disruptive, delusional and obsessed by the conviction that someone or something was stealing her soul.
The narrative art of Mo Yan that emerges from the collection can therefore be classified as a kind of Chinese baroque, floridly imaginative to the point of being bizarre.
Corwin gave the same answer less floridly and a bit more clearly:
Or as the Dallas Morning News critic Scott Cantrell floridly put it, "Ms.
Yet, in V, which is a floridly musical masterpiece, one can't help noting that Morris's forays into the classical dance world have stayed with him, as they might with any artist who incorporates all life experiences into his work.