flooding


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flooding

 [flud´ing]
in behavior therapy, a form of desensitization for the treatment of phobias and related disorders in which the patient is repeatedly exposed to highly distressing stimuli without being able to escape but without danger, until the lack of reinforcement of the anxiety response causes its extinction. In general, the term is used for actual exposure to the stimuli, with implosion used for imagined exposure, but the two terms are sometimes used synonymously to describe either or both types of exposure. Compare systematic desensitization.

flood·ing

(flŭd'ing),
1. Profuse bleeding from the uterus, especially after childbirth or in severe cases of menorrhagia. Synonym(s): flood (1)
2. Profuse uterine hemorrhage. Synonym(s): flood (2)
3. A type of behavior therapy; a therapeutic strategy at the beginning of therapy in which the patients imagine the most anxiety-producing scene and fully immerse (flood) themselves in it. Compare: systematic desensitization.

flooding

/flood·ing/ (flud´ing) a form of desensitization for treating phobias and anxieties by repeated exposure to highly distressing stimuli until the lack of reinforcement of the anxiety response causes its extinction. It is usually used for actual exposure to the stimuli, with implosion used for imagined exposure, but the two terms are sometimes used synonymously.

flooding

Etymology: AS, flod
1 profuse bleeding from the uterus, especially after childbirth or prolonged menses.
2 also called implosive therapy, a technique used in behavior therapy for the reduction of anxiety associated with various phobias. Exposure to a stimulus that usually provokes anxiety desensitizes a person to that stimulus, thereby reducing fear and anxiety. Compare systemic desensitization.

flooding

Psychology
A form of behavioural therapy for a specific phobia, in which the individual is “intensely” exposed to the object (e.g., snakes, spiders) or situation that he or she normally tries to avoid. The hope is that by “flooding” the person’s psyche with the dread event or object, his or her anxiety would be exhausted and learn to cope.

flooding

Forced exposure, implosion Psychiatry A behavior therapy for phobias and other problems linked to maladaptive anxiety, in which triggers are presented in intense forms, either in imagination or in real life; the presentations are continued until the stimuli no longer produce disabling anxiety; the hope is that by 'overloading'–ie flooding the person's psyche with the dread event or object, anxiety is exhausted and the Pt learns to cope with largely irrational fears. See Aversion therapy, Behavioral therapy, Encounter group therapy, Imaging aversion therapy, Systematic desensitization.

flood·ing

(flŭd'ing)
1. Bleeding profusely from the uterus, especially after childbirth or in severe cases of menorrhagia.
2. A type of behavior therapy; a therapeutic strategy at the beginning of therapy, in which the patients imagine the most anxiety-producing scene and fully immerse (flood) themselves in it.

flooding

a technique of training or behavior modification in which an extreme version of a feared stimulus is applied and continued until the fear response is diminished.
References in periodicals archive ?
The campaign is calling for spending of PS1bn a year on flood defences by 2025, a zero tolerance approach to inappropriate new developments in flood-risk areas and cross-party political consensus on long term solutions for tackling flooding.
It is impossible to prevent all flooding and so these projects are vital to help make people aware of the risks they face and explain the actions they can take to reduce the devastation flooding can cause.
As a result of climate change and increased pressure on land use flooding will continue to grow in importance as a public policy issue.
The risks and impacts of flooding can be reduced through schemes like Flood Plan UK, as well as by preventing inappropriate housing development in the flood plain and ensuring that properties, when flooded, are rebuilt to resilient standards.
However, surprisingly many people take no steps whatsoever to safeguard their home against the increasing risk of flooding.
Ron Davis, an Illinois state mitigation officer for FEMA, said an at-grade structure in a 100-year flood plain has a 30 percent chance of flooding during its 30-year mortgage: The chance of fire occurring during that same time period is 1 percent.
Supporters point to similar multibillion dollar flood control projects already constructed by Britain and the Netherlands to protect the London and Rotterdam waterfronts from wind-driven flooding events.
More than 1,900 incidents of flooding of property were reported in the space of a week but the majority, about 1,500, received no warning of the advancing floods.
Five million people in England and Wales live in high risk flood areas, but less than one in 20 in England, and one in ten in Wales are prepared for flooding, according to an Environment Agency Report.
The modules are then strung together with connection plates to form a barrier, strong enough to hold back 80 per cent of what Bishop calls most "passive" flooding.
THE Environment Agency is warning householders in Leamington and Warwick to be prepared for possible flooding this autumn.
Put up a dam to prevent the flooding, and people will build.